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Archive Monthly Archives: July 2019

Male ballet dancer on black background work life balance

Is that the work-life balance you want?

Work life balance – does it matter?

Work – work is hard, it’s no fun, a necessary evil.  To be happy, you need balance, your life has to be better, so it evens out the hardship you must endure every day at work.

Really?  Is that the work-life balance you want?

I’ve been saying for a long time that work should be fun, motivating, rewarding, meaningful.  Fulfilling, purposeful, challenging.  Yes, there will be times when the going gets tough, but if you love the purpose of your work, then you can deal with the hard times.  But that’s a bit different to believing that work is hard, something you must endure to earn a living.

So is a good work-life balance the answer?

I’ve just finished reading Nine Lies about Work by Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall. Lie #8 – work life balance matters most. I’m blown away by this.  You might think they’re off their trolley saying this is a lie, of course work life balance matters. But what they say is that it’s more important to be in love with your work. 

One of the most moving things I’ve ever read in a business or personal development book is the story they tell of Sergei Polunin. He was a ​principal dancer at the Royal Ballet who quit at the height of his fame because he was unhappy in his work.  I found it particularly tragic that a dancer, surely an artistic form that you can only do if you love your art, had to quit because he was unhappy in his work.

You might know this story, it was big news when it happened in 2012.  (I didn’t, I don’t follow ballet.) Buckingham and Goodall then tell us how he fell back in love with his art, which was also big news, there’s been a documentary.  It started with a performance on You Tube, and you can see this here.  It’s worth watching, even if you’re not a ballet fan. Buckingham and Goodall say...

​‘…you’ll recognise it not only as the work of a man at the end of his tether, but also as a pure expression of technical craft and unabashed joy.  You see here a man who is taking his loves seriously, interlacing them with craft and discipline, and contributing to us something passionate, rare and pure.’

Red threads

They talk about red threads, what are the threads in your work that you love? Identify them, and then weave more of them into your work. Fall in love with what you do, and spend more time doing those things at work.

If you’re in full time work, then that’s 35, 40 hours a week – more, if you’re in a stressful job where you’re being taken advantage of - you’re devoting to your employer.  Do you want to spend that time resenting what you’re being asked to do?  Or do you want to bring your best self, do what you love, bring your contribution to the world?  If you’re in a difficult situation, then I get that it’s not a simple fix. ​A difficult boss or colleagues can be challenging. But if you can find joy in what you’re doing, you’ll feel better about the worst parts of the deal. You'll also be stronger and more able to deal with them.

If you want to know where to start, I’m going to take a leaf out of the book again. Buckingham and Goodall suggest keeping a note for a week of what tasks you love, and what tasks you loathe, as you do them over the course of the week.  No need to worry ​where there's no strong feelings, just the extremes.  At the end of a work week, you will have a list of your red threads.  There’s no need for all of your threads at work to be red; research found that if they make up 20% or more of what you do, then you are in love with your work. I'm surprised it's such a small proportion, but that gives hope.  If you have other issues, such as difficult working relationships, then at least you know you have a solid foundation on which to build.

Start small

If you’ve read some of my other articles, you’ll know that I’m a big advocate of starting small with making a change.  Does this activity sound like something you could do?  If it does, I’ve made it a little easier by preparing a simple checklist you can ​download and use for the process.

You can also see my review of Nine Lies about Work here.  I’d love to know what you think of it.

Get your checklist now and find your red threads

​Reference

Buckingham, Marcus and Goodall, Ashley, 2019 ​Nine Lies about Work, ​Harvard Business Review Press Boston, Massachusetts​​​