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Adult woman at desk with laptop 40 something bored at work

40 something and bored at work?

I was described as a 40 something the other day.  I’ll take that, thanks 😊. If you’ve read some of my other posts, you’ll know I left my 40s behind a good while ago.

We were talking about work, and it got me thinking about where I was working in my 40s.  It wasn’t a bad job – there were plenty of interesting things to do, I got on well with the boss, and there were only the two of us for most of the time.  But there were no prospects, and to be honest I wasn’t using my best skills all that much.  The wider organisation – head office, the charity’s trustees – didn’t really know me or my best skills and had no interest in helping me use them or develop and grow.  So I got bored. I needed more.

They say 40 is the new 30

​50 is the new 40, 60 is… well, you get the idea.  And while it’s fun to bask in the glow of being taken for younger than you are, the reality is that we are living longer, are fitter, healthier, have more energy than our grandparents did.  We have active brains and expect more from life.

If you’re a 40 or 50 something – you have at least 10 years of your working life in front of you. With pensions the way they are in the UK, it’s probably going to be longer than that.

How does that make you feel? If you’re living your life just counting the clock down until you can retire, you’re doing it wrong.  If the thought of another 10, 20 or hell, even more years of turning up for this job fills you with horror, ask yourself, why are you choosing to live like this?

You might be taking issue with me now.

​‘I’m not choosing to live this way! I have no choice! I have bills, commitments, family to support!’

There’s always a choice

You might feel trapped in you job.  You need the pay, you don’t have the skills, or the confidence to look for something else.  You’ve looked, without success.  Work sucks anyway, a new job will likely turn out just as bad as this one.  Or even worse, and then what?

We may be stuck in a given situation for a time, but we can always choose our response to what happens, how we deal with it.

Even if you haven’t read his account, you’ve probably heard of Viktor Frankl, who wrote about his experiences in Auschwitz, and how those who gave up on life were the first to die. He says

​We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread.  They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.

​Viktor Frankl

Man's Search for Meaning

Are you just waiting to be happy?

Your job may be bad, but I’m pretty sure it’s not as bad as Auschwitz. This is such an uplifting read, despite its subject, it gives a great perspective on the resilience of people. (I made a video with my thoughts on the account, you can watch it here.)

Do you want to be one of those people who waits to be happy, waits till a retirement that you might not be able to take, or won’t be able to enjoy because you have no disposable income? Is that what it would take for you to be happy – an absence of work?  We hear so much these days about the importance of purpose and meaning in our lives, But Frankl was saying it after the war, after a harrowing experience, and how much it helped those who survived.

Are you asking yourself if there’s more to life than this?

There is.  If you want to make a start now and feel happier at work today, I have put together my best tips for making a change.  It’s free to download.  If you want to find out seven things you can do today to feel happier at work, get it here.

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

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2 comments
Vicky Etherington says 19th July 2019

Amazing quote about the concentration camps. So very humbling.

Reply
    Lindsay Milner says 22nd July 2019

    Thank you Vicky, I found Frankl’s account so inspiring. It’s not just an account; as he was a psychiatrist, he gave it a profesiosnal twist too.

    Reply
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