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A journey of a thousand miles. Feet walking through rainy street

A journey of a thousand miles

A journey of 1000 miles begins with the first step.  Those ancient sayings always sound so wise don’t they?  And when it’s a literal journey, like walking the Camino de Santiago or the Great Wall of China, it’s easy enough to work out what the first step is.

But what if it’s not a literal journey? What if you’re using it as an analogy – the ‘j’ word as they call it on Strictly Come Dancing, or the journey of X Factor contestants?  Maybe even then first step isn’t so difficult to work out – accept when the BBC ask you onto Strictly, turn up for the X Factor audition. Sometimes though, the first step isn’t so obvious.  Or you find you take a step, but it doesn’t take you in the right direction.  You take the first step, but then give up before you reach your goal. (Been there, done that, got the t-shirt – so many times.)

Last year, I started my weight loss journey.  Yes, this is one of those things I’ve tried so many times and given up because it got too difficult.  This time it’s different. Yes, really.  What’s different about it is that I have learned how to overcome setbacks.  I’ve learned to keep going, even when the going gets tough, and get back on the diet and exercise horse after Christmas, birthday meals out, felt a bit down so I ate all the food….

​I might also be seeing how many cliches I can shoe horn into this post!

Stay with me on this – it might not be obvious how this helps you at work, but I’ll get to it.  First, I’d like to share with you what makes the difference this time.  My first step was to commit to exercise three times a week for eight weeks.  I made this a public pledge on stickk.com. I was doing no exercise at all.  I wore a fitbit, and I was averaging 3000 – 4500 steps a day, and doing no other type of exercise.  So I didn’t prescribe what type of exercise it had to be – going to the gym for a class, or just a gym session, or even going for a 20 minute walk.  All counted, I just had to do three in a week.

Five things made the difference for me

  • Making a public commitment
  • Making the commitment to myself
  • Starting small
  • Building on success
  • Measuring progress


Let’s look at each of these in a little more details

Making a public commitment

Owain Service and Rory Gallagher in their book, Think Small, say that making yourself publicly accountable is one of the foundations of creating good habits successfully.  Stickk.com is a great place to do this.  You can make a pledge of any kind, and get someone to check up on you.  As an added incentive, you can pledge that you will pay a fine if you don’t succeed – a donation to a cause you don’t support, direct to your referee, or to stickk.com itself.  I couldn’t even bring myself to pledge a donation to the Conservative Party as an incentive to stick to my pledge, so I went for paying the website.  In the event, however, I achieved three sessions for the full eight weeks.  But if you feel you need the extra discipline of the threat of your hard earned money going to someone you detest, the option is there!

Making the commitment to myself

The discipline of the pledge helped me without a doubt, but I’d also been reading a lot of things where a commitment to oneself kept coming up.  This resonated strongly with me, and I decided I was going to do this, exercise more, for me.  It became really important for me to follow through, whereas before, without being very specific, I frequently let myself down.

Start small

I didn’t set out to stick to a restrictive diet, do one hour classes three times a week, walk 10,000 steps a day or any other goal that would have been too much.  If I did a 20 minute walk, I counted that.  Sometimes I did 30, but I was happy if I’d done 20.  Or I did a 30 minute class. (Signing up for a class was another way I ensured I was committed.  Very useful in the early days.) Three a week was do-able.  Five, was more than a challenge, it would have been too hard.

Building on success

Achieving my exercise target gave me such a lift.  Charles Duhigg, in The Power of Habit talks about a cornerstone habit.  I always felt that regular exercise would be a cornerstone habit for me.  It encourages me to eat more healthy food, and less junk.  About four weeks in, I decided to start a low carb plan, and log food in My Fitness Pal.  But the cornerstone habit is a bit more significant than that.  Just realising that I could succeed in an area of my life I’d always struggled with made me more motivated in other areas.  I developed self discipline.  Turned down food I wanted really.  Left for the gym for early classes, leaving home at 5.40 or 6 am.  Went for a walk when it was pouring with rain and I didn’t want to.

I also discovered that My Fitness Pal gives you more calories if you’re more active, so exercise got me more food!  In just over nine months, I have lost 3 stone (42 lbs, or 19 kg)

I found that I became more self disciplined with my work projects too. Bonus.  And demonstrates the power of the cornerstone habit.

Measuring progress

In The 12 week year, Brian P Moran and Michael Lennington, set out a process for measuring your progress.  They talk about lead indicators and lag indicators.  Lag indicators are the ones we usually focus on with weight loss for example.  Have we lost weight on the scales this week? How much? Lead indicators though, help to tell as you’re going along how likely are you to achieve the lag targets.  If you need to stick to a plan of 1200 calories to lose 1lb a week (and My Fitness Pal or a Fitbit will work these things out for you) what you need to measure is whether you adhered to the plan. 

Moran and Lennington say that 85% implementation rate will usually result in success with the lag indicators. Not a precise science for everything of course, but at least you have measurements to monitor right?  You can adjust, if you are monitoring on a weekly basis.

So what’s all this got to do with being happy at work?

These five success factors can all be transferred to any goal you have in life.  If you’re not happy at work and you know you need to make a change, where do you start? What’s your first step? Starting small can have a profound effect, so I suggest you start small.

There are seven things you can do today that will help you to be happier at work.  They are all simple (though not necessarily easy) and some are very simple indeed. 

  • Say a cheerful good morning as you arrive
  • Take a basket of fruit for everyone to share
  • Give positive feedback
  • Offer to help a colleague
  • ​Start a gratitude journal
  • Operate from positive intent
  • Invite colleagues to a shared activity

You can get a download here with more about these seven things.

​Make your commitment here.  Start small, pick one.  Tell me in the comments which one, and how often you will do it.  Or choose your own, it's your commitment.  I'll just help you follow through.

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

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