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Why can’t you motivate yourself at work any more?

Is motivation at work a problem for you?  What’s the difference between motivation, willpower and self discipline? How can they help you to feel happier at work? Why can't you motivate yourself at work any more?

Bear with me while I go in to a little depth on the differences and whether you can develop these characteristics.  I’ll then explain how they can help you at work.

For years I thought I struggled with motivation. Or lack of willpower.  Turns out it's not motivation or willpower that cause the problems, it's poor self discipline. Once I realised the difference, I started working on developing better self discipline to good effect.  So what are the differences?  Let’s start with some dictionary definitions

​Motivate

Cause a person to act in a particular way, stimulate the interest of a person in an activity

Motivation can be

  • Extrinsic – something else motivates us to action
  • Intrinsic – we are able to motivate ourselves to action

​Willpower

​Control exercised by deliberate purpose over impulse; self control

​Self discipline

​The act of or ability to apply oneself, control one’s feelings etc; self control

And a bonus definition…

​Self control

​The power of controlling one’s external reactions, emotions etc

They don’t sound all that different – motivation sounds like things that make us act, so a pull towards, if you like.  Willpower or self control sound a bit like the opposite, we have to resist temptation, not do something that’s bad for us..  And self discipline? Both, by the sound of things, the discipline to do something we should, or not do something we shouldn’t.

Motivation

You can see there are two types of motivation

Extrinsic, like getting paid for your work, not getting in the bosses bad books, meeting the customer’s needs so that they don’t get angry.  Or so that they are happy with us, we’re motivated by the approval.

Intrinsic – it comes from within ourselves, we’re able to get on with something that we really want to, just because we want to.  This is where I used to fail.  I’d want to lose weight, but instead of going to the gym I’d eat cake.

One of my favourite quotes ever is Zig Ziglar on motivation.  He said people often complained that motivation doesn’t last,  and his reply? Neither does bathing, that’s why we do it every day.  I used to wonder what I had to do to motivate myself every day, because as much as I love the quote, it doesn’t really tell me the answer. I wrote more on how much this annoyed me here.

Willpower

So I read that willpower doesn’t work.  We run out of it, it’s a finite resource.  A bit like energy, if you use it all up one day, you have to rest and recharge to build up your supplies again.  What this means is that if you start your day stressed getting the kids out of the house for school, college or whatever, and making sure they have a decent breakfast before they go, and have got all the kit they need for the day, and having a healthy breakfast yourself, then battling with traffic or the public transport commute, the bus is late again, you have to stand on the way in, and then you’ve got to be nice to your boss and your incompetent colleagues, and not lose your temper with a dissatisfied client, you run out of willpower to make a start on that massive report that you know you should be working on, but it’s ok because it’s not due for a couple of weeks yet.  The best thing I’ve read on willpower is actually called ‘Willpower doesn’t work’, written by Benjamin Hardy.  You can find my review of this book on You Tube.  Spoiler alert – it’s worth a read.

Self discipline

So if will power doesn’t work, is self discipline the answer? I mean, it’s not that different by the sound of things, both require self control.  Well, yes and no.  It is, but the trick is to develop it.  It’s not something you either have or don’t have.  It’s like a muscle.  Exercise it, build up its strength and it will get stronger.  And much like exercise, the way to do this is through a regular habit.  Start small – you can’t go into a gym and lift 85kg the first time you go in, if you’ve never lifted weights before. Especially if you’re an unfit overweight middle aged woman like me.  Hell, I couldn’t pick up the 20kg kettlebell this time last year. I mean, literally couldn’t lift it from the floor.  But I did in fact lift 85kg a couple of months ago, after a programme that built up from what I could do, and now I regularly lift 60-65kg. And look at that, I now have the self discipline required for a regular exercise habit.  Pretty amazing considering all my life I’ve struggled with this and never made exercise a regular part of my life.

What's the answer?​

And so it is with any habit. Start small.  Use tricks to make sure you’re reminded to do what you said you’d do.  Make sure your environment supports your new habit, make it easy to do. 

And that, there is the answer.  You have to practice self discipline, and develop yourself so that you are better at it.  How? Are you screaming at me now?  Tell me how!  I will come to that.  But first, you want to know how they can help you be happier at work.

How to be happier at work

Do you often complain about having to go in to work?  Do you complain about your boss, your incompetent colleagues who leave everything to you?  Do you feel miserable at the prospect of another work week?  I’m sorry to break it to you, but you’re doing this to yourself.  These feelings and responses are bad habits.  If you want to feel happier at work, you  have got to put some effort into changing your approach.  Look back at that definition of self control – controlling one’s external reactions and emotions.  Daniel Goleman found that people who have good emotional intelligence do better at work, and part of this is managing one’s own emotions.  

There’s loads of recent findings that suggest that happiness comes before success, and let’s face it, mostly we only want to be successful because we want to be happy. So it makes sense to work on being happy.  Aristotle is often quoted as saying that ‘We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit’.  (He apparently didn’t, but that doesn’t make the observation less true.)  We are what we repeatedly do.  If we repeatedly complain, we’re a complainer.  If we are repeatedly cheerful and enthusiastic…. well, you can work that out. Being happy, cheerful, optimistic, enthusiastic, motivated… these are all habits we can develop.  This is good news!  You’re not doomed to this miserable job for the rest of your working life! You can turn it into something you love. You can move on when you’re ready, for the right opportunity, rather than jumping out of the frying pan into the fire.

Start small

My favourite mantra at the moment is start small.  But I also think it is worth thinking about what will make the biggest difference.  In Atomic Habits, Clear talks about habits that have a ripple effect.  In the Power of Habits, Charles Duhigg talks about keystone habits.  For me, exercise was a keystone habit, exercising has a knock on effect of helping me to eat more healthily too. What you need to do is work out what you could do that would be simple to implement, but would have a similar ripple effect.

Two things that worked really well for me were

  • Making a public pledge on stickk.com
  • Using focusmate.com

Stickk.com

Stickk.com is a website where you make your commitment; I committed to exercise three times a week for eight weeks.  If I failed on my commitment in any week, I would be fined.  I got people to referee and support me, so people checking up that I was following through.  Although in fact, it was more the matter of pride that ensured I followed through.

Focusmate.com

Focusmate.com is a website where you sign up for a 50 minute work session, and it pairs you up with a random person on the internet who wants to do the same thing.  At the beginning of the session, you tell each other what you’re working on, and at the end you say how you’ve done.  Throughout, you have your computer’s camera and microphone on, so they can see if you’re still sat there working, or hear if you have YouTube videos going.  I’m sitting here now with Jasmin, who is working on transcribing interviews for her Masters degree while I finish this article.  But the bit that really works for me on this is if I book for a session at 9am the next morning, I have to be at my desk at 9am because someone is depending on me to be there when I said I would.  It is also easier to focus on one task for a 50 minute sprint, and not get distracted by Facebook.

So I wholeheartedly recommend starting small, and trying one of these web tools.  If you want to understand the process behind how our brains work and how to change your habits, read Willpower doesn’t work, and also read Atomic Habits by James Clear, they give so much useful – and scientifically backed – advice on how to stop habits you don’t want, and start the ones you do.

Still don’t know where to start?  Don’t worry, it can seem overwhelming at first.  If you want some help with this, sign up for my free webinar on 6th June, where I’ll walk you through a review of what’s going on for you, and what you’d like to change.  I’ll have resources and worksheets available to guide you, step by step, and help you identify what might be a keystone habit for you at work.

Clear, James, 2018.​ Atomic Habits.​ Random House Business Books, London

Charles Duhigg, 2012.The Power of Habit​. ​Random House Group, London

​Hardy, Benjamin,  ​2018. Willpower Doesn't Work. ​​​Piatkus, London

Ego master your ego

Master your ego

​Master your ego – there’s a day of the year dedicated to this; Ego Awareness Day. Saturday 11th May is the second ego awareness day, it began in 2018.  Who decides on these days? I went to the website, and it’s a very earnest website, with no individuals credited on there.  In fact, one of the descriptions almost made me feel it was a spoof day.

I’ll be honest, I first started getting interested in days of the year as a bit of a running joke with my brother and sister.  My brother posted on facebook that it was Penguin Awareness Day, not to be confused with World Penguin Day or African Penguin Awareness Day. Amongst other things, I was staggered that there was even such a thing as African penguins, so clearly the awareness day thing works.  Since then, we periodically highlight others that amuse us. 

Ego awareness day

So, ego awareness day.  As a blogger, we learn to connect to these days so we can hashtag them on social media, and I couldn’t let this one pass.  I wondered if there was something in it.

The latest book I reviewed says, among other things, that the biggest obstacle to change in the workplace is the leader.  He’s talking about you.  The leader who wants to make the change, the reader of his book.  His advice? Learn to master your ego.


Aaron Dignan

​Brave New Work

‘Work to master your ego. Work to quiet your voice.  Work to step out of the way.  You must become a paragon of trying new things.  Starting new loops.  Asking big questions.  Don’t stay stuck in the habit of evaluating and judging the work of others.  Go find something to do.

‘Your new job is to ensure that the conditions for change are in place, not just now but in perpetuity. While you won’t be doing as much “leading” in the traditional sense, you’ll be doing something far more rewarding. You’ll be creating and holding space for change.’


Not sure if that’s an accurate version of the quote, I had to rely on Google, and there are a few variations.  But you get the idea.  And if it’s good enough for Einstein, I’m pretty sure it’s good enough for the rest of us.

Setting aside the earnestness of the ego awareness website then, and the idea that there should be a world ego awareness day, is there merit in the idea of mastering the ego?

Well, yes.  If you view it as a reflection that none of us are perfect, we all need to continue to learn, develop and grow, then of course we need to master the ego.  I know I’m guilty of believing I’m always right (ask my husband) and it generally takes proof for me to admit I’m wrong.  I also discovered recently how I like to retain control, as I described here.  It’s difficult to let go, and as leaders in the workplace it’s so tempting to think that we know best.

Dignan also says that the old practices of scientific management, embodied by Frederick Taylor, separated the thinking from the doing[2].  And it’s disturbing how much this attitude still prevails, with managers telling their teams what to do, and sometimes even what to think. As autonomy is so important to our motivation, no wonder so many people are dissatisfied and disengaged at work.

What can you do to master the ego?  

Well, I won’t pretend I have all the answers. (Despite my tendency to think I’m right)  ​But here’s a few suggestions to get you started.

  • ​Practice mindfulness
  • ​Ask someone for help - admit that you can't do something alone and that you'd like to learn from them
  • ​Listen to feedback from someone you usually don’t. Really listen.  Ask them how your behaviour affects them.  Ask them what could you do differently, and agree to act on one of their suggestions.
  • ​Find something to do.  Try something new. Something you’ve never done before.  I recommend improv, but anything where you’re starting as a beginner is good.
  • ​Read Mindset by Carol Dweck. [3] An open mind and a growth mindset are immensely valuable.

​Let me know what you think.  Will you work on mastering your ego?  Will you try one of these suggestions?

Author with newborn granddaughter

Birthdays – a time for reflection

Birthdays - a time for reflection. Last year, I was horrified about being 60, it seemed so grown up. In my head, I’m still a teenager.  I laugh at fart jokes and swear words, (swear words are funny, ok?) my husband’s dad jokes on Facebook, daft things with my kids and five year old grandson. I still love rock music, including some new (ish) stuff, although I’m hopelessly out of touch with what’s new.  I will get up and dance round my handbag at a family do. Yes, I know teenagers don’t do that any more, but that’s what I did, so it counts.

The last few years my birthday has been overshadowed because it is also the date we lost my much loved mother in law. I’m thinking today too about my own mom, who passed away at the age of 60. So I’m relieved to have made it to 61.

Counting my blessings

In the last year I’ve taken up weight training, photography and improvisational comedy. I’ve lost three stones – more than 40 lbs - and can now walk further than the length of my local High St without needing to lie down for a rest.

I’m enjoying working on developing a business, and I think, after all these years, I’ve cured myself of procrastination 😆

I have a wonderful family who I love so much; a husband who loves me and has supported me for 40 years of marriage.  A grown up son who’s worked hard to gain his engineering qualifications and I’m immensely proud of.   A daughter and son in law, who are lovely parents to two beautiful children, my five year old grandson and his new baby sister.

I’m blessed with lovely extended family and supportive friends. Sisters, brothers, their families, the in laws, with all their aunts, uncles, cousins, first cousins once removed, second cousins…. There are hundreds of them.  And we get to see and spend time with a fair few.  Not often, but when we do, it’s usually joyous.  Friends, old and new, people I worked with years ago, people I’ve met more recently, people who support other solopreneurs and entrepreneurs. 

So this year, instead of cursing about my age, I’ve decided to be grateful I’m still here, getting older, loving life. I’ve been talking about gratitude as a great way to improve your mood and positivity for a while now.  But something about today just made me properly feel it.

​62nd year, bring it on

And then, the universe came knocking

​It’s usually my husband who goes in for meaningful reflective posts on Facebook, but today it just seemed right, so I posted something similar to this in my timeline.  I was in a great mood, fully happy with life.  And then, just when I didn’t need a reminder of how life is short, the universe sent me one anyway.

I’d just got home from a walk, sat down with a cup of fruit tea while deciding what tasks to do next, when there was a knock at the door.  A neighbour stood there.  He’s lived across the road from me for almost the whole time we’ve been in this house, more than thirty years.  His daughter is the same age as my son, we used to walk to school together with her and her mom.  He said his wife died on Monday.  She was 56 years of age.

They’d had so much to look forward to. Two years earlier, they had sold their house and were planning to move to a village in the countryside.  It all fell apart when she collapsed suddenly one night and suffered brain damage.  ​For the past two years, she had needed full time care, unable to speak, eat, walk or do anything for herself.  And now she’s gone.  Her daughter’s baby girl will never know her nanna growing up.  There will be no mother of the bride at the wedding later this year. My neighbour has lost the happy retirement in the countryside they had both planned.

We weren’t close friends – we’d not really spent much time together since those walks to school, somehow our friendship didn’t develop into a close one and we drifted in different directions when there was no reason to spend time together.  So in one respect, it won’t leave a hole in my life. But my word, what a shock.  Even though I knew her quality of life wasn’t there, even though her husband recognised that, I can’t help but feel for him and his family. Such a personal tragedy. 

And I know these things happen all the time, there are countless personal tragedies happening daily. I lost my parents many years ago.  We all know people who’ve lost people, fathers to cancer, mothers to strokes, partners to pneumonia, even people who have lost children.  But there was something about the way I was feeling yesterday, remembering my mom perhaps, and feeling relieved that I’m still here even though she’d died aged 60, this news hit me like a cold shower. It was the starkest of stark reminders that we don’t know what tomorrow will bring, we need to be grateful for the good things we have in life, and don’t waste it on stuff that doesn’t matter.  And definitely, don’t live for retirement.  You can’t guarantee that you’ll have one.

​Loving life

It was also a reminder of how much I do have to be thankful for.  I probably love my life now more than I ever have.  I’ve counted my blessings above, so I won’t go over them again.  But I will say one more thing; if there are things in your life you wish were different, don’t waste any more time wishing, take action.  Do something.  And I’ve said many times before, I know how hard that is, those habits are so ingrained; sometimes we even know we’re doing something from habit, but still carry on ​despite knowing it’s hurting us.

Start small.  I’ve said this before; start small. If you don’t know how, this post will give you some ideas. Or this one.

Start even smaller by leaving me a comment below, tell me what you’re grateful for today.

Older employee mental health issues

Brushing off mental health issues

An article in this week’s HR Review states that older employees are ‘brushing off’ mental health issues. This is taken from a study by BUPA and some of the findings relating to over 55s are that

  • Two thirds of employees in this age group suffer symptoms of mental ill health, including anxiousness, continuous low mood, feelings of hopelessness and insomnia
  • 21% feel it’s not appropriate to discuss mental health problems at work
  • Only one in ten confide in colleagues or a manager
  • 24% say their symptoms don’t indicate anything serious
  • They are slowest to seek help, delaying for 54 days on average

​BUPA’s point with the article seems to be to encourage older employees to feel more confident in recognising symptoms and seeking help. Which is all very admirable.

Do you need professional help?

For me though, as one of those older people (ok, not an employee any longer, but definitely in that age group) the article raises more questions than it answers. Those symptoms – are they an indication that professional help is needed? Continuous low mood – if you’re not happy at work, then yes, you may have a continuous low mood. Is that an indication of a mental health issue, or is it a question of an individual’s mindset?

There’s a line between what is a mental health issue that needs professional support and someone who is unhappy because they have a fixed mindset and, to quote Carol Dweck[1], think the world needs to change, not them. Or, as Jen Sincero [2] says, people with bad habits and limiting beliefs, head towards the big snooze – a life of mediocrity.  It’s too easy to sleepwalk through life, meeting obligations , family commitments, having to earn a living, and then find that you’re stuck in some boring job that doesn’t inspire you or seem meaningful.    That doesn’t translate necessarily into a mental health issue that needs professional help.  There are things you can do, take action yourself, make a change.  I know, because I’ve done it.

Apparently, many say that mental health simply ‘doesn’t affect me’. Is this because, as a comment on the article suggests, that older employees won’t speak up because they are afraid that if they do, their job is at risk? (Quite possibly.) Or is it because baby boomers are used to just getting on with things, even if they don’t feel like it? I’d say this is a definite characteristic of us baby boomers. Amongst the women, there’s a sense of obligation to our family commitments that mean we struggle on. Many men of this age still feel it is somehow weak to seek help for mental health issues.

And that 54 days before seeking help – so less than two months. You might legitimately feel that things will get better of their own accord without needing help; although, I realise I can’t argue this without proving BUPA’s point! But I’d still say; is less than two months suffering a continuous low mood an inordinately long time to wait before seeking help? Maybe younger people are too quick to say they have a problem that they can’t solve themselves?

​Why do we feel this way?

One statistic in their findings I do find shocking is that two thirds of people in this age group suffer symptoms like anxiousness, (is anxiousness the same as anxiety? I’d have said anxiety, but the study said anxiousness. Maybe there’s some semantic difference I’m not aware of) continuous low mood, feelings of hopelessness and insomnia. Even if BUPA are overstating the extent of the problem, this is a terrible indictment of the quality of life for working baby boomers. I’ve long believed that work should be meaningful, enjoyable and rewarding. Surely us over 50s have earned the right to be doing something we love with our time, something we find useful and that we look forward to doing? Surely we should not be feeling hopeless, anxious or continuously in a low mood?

What is often not said is that it is work that makes us feel this way. Our lifelong feeling of ​not being valued in jobs that don’t feel meaningful leads to low self esteem and has a knock on effect on the rest of our lives. We don’t have interesting personal lives, we’re too tired once we get back from work to take part in social activities or hobbies, our family relationships may be suffering, and our health, fitness and diet aren’t ideal, making the tiredness worse.

I don’t want to suggest that you shouldn’t seek professional help if you need it, and if your company is enlightened and supportive enough to offer this, that’s awesome, use it. Or use the NHS. I'm not medically trained in any way, but my own past experience of support from the NHS for mental health issues hasn't really addressed issues of low self esteem and confidence. This has taken a lot of personal effort in self development and informal support instead.

​So if it’s that you’re just unhappy at work, take action. Take control, and take back your power. There are some simple things you can do to be happier, and you can start today with these seven things.

Support, positive intent

Can we find the postive intent?

What do we mean by positive intent?  I was reminded this week of the importance of belonging, and feeling like people have your back.  I said a few weeks back that the principles of improv include making sure your colleagues look good.  It embraces looking after them, making sure they are ok. It was a perfect chance to see this in action, because we did our first live performance this week, a showcase in front of family and friends.  Not a work situation, but I can see the parallels.

L'esprit de l'escalier

At times, I was a bit like a rabbit in the headlights.  I’m a little slow to catch onto ideas, so often I didn’t know how to react.  That French phrase, l’esprit de l’escalier, oh my goodness, how many of those have I had? When you think of the funny response on the way out.  But actually, there were also some that I had there and then, but wasn’t quick enough to jump in, and someone moved the action on. I found myself frustrated that I’d got a potentially funny story line, but lost the chance to use it.

Audience members amongst my friends said that a couple of the performers dominated.  There are some big personalities involved.  I also heard that one of the performers was upset about this, though I was not witness to the discussion they had.

I just wanted to share some of my feelings about the experience, and to examine my responses a bit more closely.

Belonging

There have been moments where I didn’t quite feel like I belonged.  I’m older than everyone else, and that doesn’t usually bother me.  Some friendships have been forged, meeting up at the weekend, sharing stories of dating and how that’s going. I’ve been married for donkey’s years and I’m a grandma, so obviously that social life is not for me. Some in jokes have developed amongst the lads, and I didn’t always feel included with those.

On the other hand, there were others who I really bonded with, and the tutor was always supportive and encouraging to those of us who were less confident in our ability to perform. I really liked a couple of the guys (I liked them all to be honest, even with the factors I just mentioned) and found them to be supportive too – I definitely felt that a couple of them went out of their way to help me.  There was only one other woman on the course, aside from the tutor, so we three were outnumbered by seven men.  Again, that wasn’t an issue, but I felt that the other woman also made an effort to include me, even though we are quite different personalities and she is much younger.

But then the actual performance brought up some issues.  Like I said, I was a rabbit in the headlights for much of the time. My dominant feeling afterwards was to be annoyed at myself for missing opportunities.  And then I felt bad too, because that meant I didn’t pick up on something someone else had said, even after he had taken a risk to say it. So in addition, I feel I let him down. I’m trying to be kind to myself and accept that this was the first time I’d done this live in front of an audience, but I’m still annoyed at myself.

Then others commented on the team dynamics, about people who dominated.  At first, I agreed with their perception, that a couple of people had kind of taken over.  There were times when someone rushed in, and I didn’t have the chance to take the direction I wanted to. 

I could have been annoyed about this, resenting how they took over.  But, using my developing empathy skills, let’s think about it from their point of view.  They may have been worried that the performance would go wrong, the story would get stuck.  They may have been worried that I would be stood on stage, in front of a live audience, and not know what to say, would freeze on stage.  I’d certainly frozen enough times in the weeks leading up to the show.

Positive intent

So instead of resenting them for not letting me go ahead, if I view their actions as having a positive intent, they were working to save me (and possibly one or two of the other participants) from the embarrassment of ‘dying’ on stage. Maybe they were doing what they thought was right to look after me.

I haven’t had the chance to debrief the show with them, so I have no idea what the other participants thought. I would really love to have the opportunity to talk to the guy who was upset about how it had gone.  I hope I’d be able to help him see that it wasn’t done deliberately to thwart him, but that the other person had their own concerns and was trying to help in the best way they knew how.

But if we continue with a work analogy, if someone behaves in a way that annoys you, can you reframe it, and think what their positive intent may have been?  Maybe they have anxieties of their own causing them to act in that way?  We’re going our separate ways now, but if it’s an ongoing working relationship, it’s worth the effort to look for the positive intent.  The choice is yours.  If you assume they’re out to get you, you’re building up negative feelings.  This obviously has a negative impact on you, but research consistently shows that negativity breeds negativity.  No-one likes sharing office space with a complainer.  If you assume they were trying to help you, you’ll be positively disposed towards them.  In return, they’ll like being around you, and continue to support you.

Team relationships

I get that I’ve not really made a central point here, probably because my own feelings are so entangled and it’s recent events, so I’m still trying to work it out.  We were effectively like a new team, so the relationships are also at the early stages.  It’s natural that we would get along more easily with some than others, and unavoidable I guess that there would be more than one grouping amongst us.

Annie McKee, in ‘How to be happy at work’ talks about how important friendships are at work, and how organisations can foster a spirit of openness and trust that allows friendships to develop.  The improv course did everything it could to facilitate this.  How does your workplace do?

You can see my review of ‘How to be happy at work’ here.

Working out. Consequences urgency and procrastination

Consequences, urgency and procrastination

​I’ve been thinking a lot about consequences and urgency just lately, and the effects of procrastination.

Are you stuck in a job you don’t like, and you’d really like to make some changes, but somehow you never seem to get around to doing anything about it other than complain? I just want to say, it’s not your fault.  It’s really hard to make that change, and sometimes we don’t even know where to start.  To compound the problem, our brains conspire to keep us where we are. This ​post I wrote some time ago tells you more about how it does this.

I told you in the last post how I’d finally got the diet and exercise habit.  What I didn’t say was that this was after more than forty years of failing to adopt healthy diet and fitness habits on a sustainable basis.  So yay for me!  And that got me thinking about transferring the lessons learned into other areas, and I showed you how you could start small to make some changes in your work situation.

Consequences

I realised that the reason I’ve now adopted the new habits is because there are consequences to not sticking with it.  At first, the consequence was that I’d have to pay a fine and show on a public website that I’d not achieved my goal.  But now, several months later, the consequences of not getting in my activity for the day mean that I don’t get to eat so much.  To continue losing weight, I must maintain a calorie deficit.  If I’m active, I get more calories to eat and can still maintain a deficit on the day.  If I don’t maintain a deficit, I won’t continue losing weight, and I now know that the progress motivates me.  I don’t like to see a weight gain.  I’ve associated the behaviour with the consequences.

There are other things I’d like to achieve though, and I realised that the consequences are not sufficiently associated with the results, so I need to find a way to link them – to ingrain the new habit to work towards other goals.

Urgency

Which brings me to urgency. I’ve also always been a last minute kind of woman.  As a mature student, I was often up until 3.30 am to finish an assignment.  Once, I handed something in at one minute to the deadline, and my dissertation involved two consecutive all nighters in order to get it in on time. I did well to do two consecutive all nighters – that involved me planning ahead and doing some work two days before it was due in.

Now that I work alone, I have to create my own urgency, I have no tutor or manager expecting work to be done to a specific time, so you might have noticed that I don’t post an article every week. At the moment, I don’t have readers who expect a weekly post, so there are no immediate or obvious consequences if I miss a week. So if I say here, publicly, that I will post once a week for the next eight weeks, I will need to follow through.  (There, I’ve said it.)

You may be in a job you don’t like, you may come home and complain to your family or friends about how awful it is, and you may even look at the job ads online to see if there’s anything else out there.  But you’re not really taking action, you feel stuck in your current situation.  There’s no urgency to make the change.  You need the income ​your job provides, you’re tired out when you get back with domestic responsibilities, you don’t have time to fill out job applications online. The consequences, remaining fed up, dreading Sunday evenings and Monday mornings – well, that’s how it is, you’ll just continue to whinge about it.

Urgency can be a double edged sword.  You may eventually get to the point where you’re desperate, things are so bad that you’ll start to take action.  But then your options may be limited, and you could end up in just as bad a position or worse.  Like Brenda (not her real name) who left a public sector job because she wasn’t happy there, and took a job with a charity working for a cause she believed in.  However, she soon found that the organisation had a toxic work environment. Her new manager was someone who had been promoted but wasn’t capable of her new job, there were no support structures in place to provide the training and coaching that the manager needed, a colleague was being bullied, bitching and gossip were rife.  Speaking up got her nowhere.

You don’t want to act out of real urgency and not be able to take a considered action.  So how can you create some urgency for yourself - enough to motivate you to take consistent action and start a new habit but not so much that you have to act at all costs?

As I’ve already said, I’m finding the public accountability very helpful, combined with making a commitment to myself.  Owain Service and Rory Gallagher in their book, Think Small, support the idea that making yourself publicly accountable is one of the foundations of creating good habits successfully.

Procrastination

And then we come to procrastination.  The result of consequences not having a direct link in your mind to your current behaviour, and of not having urgency to act, is procrastination.  You know you want to do something – most likely look for another job – but you put it off. There are reasons we do this – it can be too hard to take the action we want to take, it can take up too much time, we don’t give it priority over more immediate things.  This article in the New York Times puts a different light on it, and it makes perfect sense to me.  It’s not a time management problem, it’s an emotional problem.  We don’t procrastinate because we’re lazy or because we don’t have time management skills.  It’s a response to a negative mood – the urgency of managing that negative mood takes priority over the longer term consequences.  It may just be that the task itself is unpleasant, but it may also relate to deeper feelings of self doubt, low self esteem, anxiety or insecurity. 

The article gives some useful tips on dealing with procrastination.  I’d like to add one more. Start small.  Think about your habits, and what you’d like to do differently in your working life.  You may think that finding a new job is what you want – and you may be right in the long term that’s the right course of action – but starting small means exactly that.  What else could you do? The last post had a few suggestions.  Here’s a few more – they are massive goals, but small actions to make a start.

Be more confident at work

Repeat affirmations to yourself every morning

​Be more motivated

Pick a task that you must do daily or weekly at work, where you usually struggle to get it done.  Set yourself a target – must have it done by 11.30 am every day, or by Tuesday lunchtime each week, whatever is appropriate for the task.  Make a pledge in stickk.com and ask a friend at work to be your referee

​Be more creative

Walk to work, or during your lunchbreak.  Exercise has so many more benefits than just for your body.  The time walking gives your mind the opportunity to wander, enhancing your creativity. Start with three times a week, or even once a week if you’re not active.  Walk for 20 – 30 minutes.

​Be nicer at work

Smile at people. Set a target – I must smile at five people today ? You’ll probably find you’ll soon smile at more than five.

​Learn a new skill

Block out the time to devote to it.  You can’t learn a new skill without practice.  So either go to a class, or ensure you block out the time – at work if appropriate, at home if it’s not.

​Improve working relationships

Resolve to ask one person each day how they are.  And really listen to the response – give them your time and attention. Or even resolve to do this once a week to begin with

​Be more organised

Pick one task and work on that.  As for motivation, set a target, make a pledge in stickk.com

​As well as on stickk.com, make your pledge here in the comments below, and I’ll be sure to support your efforts.  Look forward to seeing how you get on.

A journey of a thousand miles. Feet walking through rainy street

A journey of a thousand miles

A journey of 1000 miles begins with the first step.  Those ancient sayings always sound so wise don’t they?  And when it’s a literal journey, like walking the Camino de Santiago or the Great Wall of China, it’s easy enough to work out what the first step is.

But what if it’s not a literal journey? What if you’re using it as an analogy – the ‘j’ word as they call it on Strictly Come Dancing, or the journey of X Factor contestants?  Maybe even then first step isn’t so difficult to work out – accept when the BBC ask you onto Strictly, turn up for the X Factor audition. Sometimes though, the first step isn’t so obvious.  Or you find you take a step, but it doesn’t take you in the right direction.  You take the first step, but then give up before you reach your goal. (Been there, done that, got the t-shirt – so many times.)

Last year, I started my weight loss journey.  Yes, this is one of those things I’ve tried so many times and given up because it got too difficult.  This time it’s different. Yes, really.  What’s different about it is that I have learned how to overcome setbacks.  I’ve learned to keep going, even when the going gets tough, and get back on the diet and exercise horse after Christmas, birthday meals out, felt a bit down so I ate all the food….

​I might also be seeing how many cliches I can shoe horn into this post!

Stay with me on this – it might not be obvious how this helps you at work, but I’ll get to it.  First, I’d like to share with you what makes the difference this time.  My first step was to commit to exercise three times a week for eight weeks.  I made this a public pledge on stickk.com. I was doing no exercise at all.  I wore a fitbit, and I was averaging 3000 – 4500 steps a day, and doing no other type of exercise.  So I didn’t prescribe what type of exercise it had to be – going to the gym for a class, or just a gym session, or even going for a 20 minute walk.  All counted, I just had to do three in a week.

Five things made the difference for me

  • Making a public commitment
  • Making the commitment to myself
  • Starting small
  • Building on success
  • Measuring progress


Let’s look at each of these in a little more details

Making a public commitment

Owain Service and Rory Gallagher in their book, Think Small, say that making yourself publicly accountable is one of the foundations of creating good habits successfully.  Stickk.com is a great place to do this.  You can make a pledge of any kind, and get someone to check up on you.  As an added incentive, you can pledge that you will pay a fine if you don’t succeed – a donation to a cause you don’t support, direct to your referee, or to stickk.com itself.  I couldn’t even bring myself to pledge a donation to the Conservative Party as an incentive to stick to my pledge, so I went for paying the website.  In the event, however, I achieved three sessions for the full eight weeks.  But if you feel you need the extra discipline of the threat of your hard earned money going to someone you detest, the option is there!

Making the commitment to myself

The discipline of the pledge helped me without a doubt, but I’d also been reading a lot of things where a commitment to oneself kept coming up.  This resonated strongly with me, and I decided I was going to do this, exercise more, for me.  It became really important for me to follow through, whereas before, without being very specific, I frequently let myself down.

Start small

I didn’t set out to stick to a restrictive diet, do one hour classes three times a week, walk 10,000 steps a day or any other goal that would have been too much.  If I did a 20 minute walk, I counted that.  Sometimes I did 30, but I was happy if I’d done 20.  Or I did a 30 minute class. (Signing up for a class was another way I ensured I was committed.  Very useful in the early days.) Three a week was do-able.  Five, was more than a challenge, it would have been too hard.

Building on success

Achieving my exercise target gave me such a lift.  Charles Duhigg, in The Power of Habit talks about a cornerstone habit.  I always felt that regular exercise would be a cornerstone habit for me.  It encourages me to eat more healthy food, and less junk.  About four weeks in, I decided to start a low carb plan, and log food in My Fitness Pal.  But the cornerstone habit is a bit more significant than that.  Just realising that I could succeed in an area of my life I’d always struggled with made me more motivated in other areas.  I developed self discipline.  Turned down food I wanted really.  Left for the gym for early classes, leaving home at 5.40 or 6 am.  Went for a walk when it was pouring with rain and I didn’t want to.

I also discovered that My Fitness Pal gives you more calories if you’re more active, so exercise got me more food!  In just over nine months, I have lost 3 stone (42 lbs, or 19 kg)

I found that I became more self disciplined with my work projects too. Bonus.  And demonstrates the power of the cornerstone habit.

Measuring progress

In The 12 week year, Brian P Moran and Michael Lennington, set out a process for measuring your progress.  They talk about lead indicators and lag indicators.  Lag indicators are the ones we usually focus on with weight loss for example.  Have we lost weight on the scales this week? How much? Lead indicators though, help to tell as you’re going along how likely are you to achieve the lag targets.  If you need to stick to a plan of 1200 calories to lose 1lb a week (and My Fitness Pal or a Fitbit will work these things out for you) what you need to measure is whether you adhered to the plan. 

Moran and Lennington say that 85% implementation rate will usually result in success with the lag indicators. Not a precise science for everything of course, but at least you have measurements to monitor right?  You can adjust, if you are monitoring on a weekly basis.

So what’s all this got to do with being happy at work?

These five success factors can all be transferred to any goal you have in life.  If you’re not happy at work and you know you need to make a change, where do you start? What’s your first step? Starting small can have a profound effect, so I suggest you start small.

There are seven things you can do today that will help you to be happier at work.  They are all simple (though not necessarily easy) and some are very simple indeed. 

  • Say a cheerful good morning as you arrive
  • Take a basket of fruit for everyone to share
  • Give positive feedback
  • Offer to help a colleague
  • ​Start a gratitude journal
  • Operate from positive intent
  • Invite colleagues to a shared activity

You can get a download here with more about these seven things.

​Make your commitment here.  Start small, pick one.  Tell me in the comments which one, and how often you will do it.  Or choose your own, it's your commitment.  I'll just help you follow through.

man and woman talking in office

Why does empathy matter to working relationships?

Last time, I said that working relationships will be smoother if you stop and consider someone else’s position before reacting.  Easier said than done.  Have you ever wanted to react angrily at work to something someone said or did?  Have you given in to that temptation? How did it work out if you did?

What happens without empathy?

​My natural reaction can be a little hot headed in some situations.  I remember losing my temper with an employee when I was chair of trustees for a small charity.  She provoked me, but that’s not really a legitimate reason.  It was in front of other staff too, which made it an even worse mistake. If I’d tried harder to see things from her perspective – loss of funding meant the future of the charity, and with it her job, were at risk, she’d worked there for about 20 years, who was I to come in and start telling her what to do, what did I know? – maybe we wouldn’t have been in a position where she continually provoked me.  And maybe, even if she had, I’d have found it easier to remain calm.

Going back even further, I had a manager who bullied me for a long time.  I used to fantasise about standing in the doorway of her office gunning her down with a machine gun.  Someone said that was too fast an end to her, but for me it captured the explosive nature of my anger. And I’m not a violent person. This work situation took away my confidence for a long time, and I harboured ill feelings towards her for a long time too.  But as I’ve grown, learned more about what makes us happy, what makes us confident and powerful, I eventually started to see things from her point of view.  She was a manager of an office of 50 staff, responsible for reaching financial targets for law enforcement.  She was probably under pressure herself from senior management to achieve those targets. Who knows what stress she was feeling, but I never considered this back then.

A rebellious team leader, arguing with her over changes, backing the team against her, she reacted inappropriately by using intimidating tactics to get me to fall into line.  They didn’t work, resulting in a breakdown of our working relationship.  If I’d stopped to consider what she needed to achieve in running the office, shown some empathy for the pressures she was under, perhaps we’d have been an awesome team.  I think she had some things to learn about managing people, but I can’t escape responsibility for this situation.

Why does empathy matter?

I first came across empathy as an important skill in the workplace in Daniel Goleman’s article for the Harvard Business Review.  Originally published in 1996, it features in their 10 must reads published in 2011.[1]  Goleman’s article is aimed at leaders, but I believe we can all benefit from nurturing this critical life skill.

Back when he first wrote this, Goleman pointed out that empathy wasn’t seen as businesslike.  Now however, we see articles in Inc - Why Empathy Is the Most Important Skill You'll Ever Need to Succeed and Forbes - Why Empathy Matters In The Workplace We get whole books devoted to helping us improve our emotional intelligence (EQ).[2]

How do you know if you are empathetic?

 

One way is to use a test, such as that in Bradberry and Greaves’ book, reference below.  Another is to ask people you trust to be honest with you.  If your working relationships are such that you cannot ask this question of anyone at work, or you believe that your team won’t feel safe enough to tell you, then you have a significant amount of learning to do.  But even if you do have trusted advisers, be prepared for surprises.  It can be difficult to know how we’re perceived by others unless we make the effort to find out, and it can be difficult to hear the answers.

And a third option – look inside yourself.  Do you feel you have empathy?  Do you feel you could improve?  On the whole, people would describe me as empathetic, but there are some situations where I don’t put myself effectively in the other person’s shoes.  I described a couple above, but they are ancient history now.  Last week at the improv course, I was acting as a mother pleading with her child to come home.  I missed a couple of things, and if that had been a real conversation, could have had serious implications. (I know it’s only pretend, but empathy and listening skills are central to good improv, as I said here.) I’m also pretty sure my husband would say I don’t see things from his point of view often enough.  

So it’s situational.  But good self awareness (one of the other components of EQ) will ensure that you know where your strengths and weaknesses are, and where you want to improve.

 

How can I learn empathy?

 

Like all of the components of emotional intelligence, we can learn empathy, but it takes commitment and reflective practice.  Goleman himself says the process is not easy. The rewards, however, are worth the effort.  Not just better working relationships, but less stress and better personal relationships too. So what can you do? Practice, is the short answer.

​Develop your listening skills

The pretend situation I mentioned above, where I was pleading with a child to come home – humour me while I use that as an example. The situation was that my daughter (played by a thirty-ish guy from Barbados) had run away from home because Daddy didn’t love her because he wanted her to be a boy. I’m not sure what age she was meant to be, but in my head, around five years old.  I totally missed the point about Daddy wanting her to be a boy, and didn’t address this in my responses. How tragic would this be if a parent missed such a comment from their daughter, whatever age she was?  While we were playing this for laughs I’m sure this will have happened in reality, and was a stark reminder to me about picking up on things, even if they’re said in passing.  Often people reveal their true feelings subtly, or inadvertently. (I’m not suggesting my improv colleague was on that occasion though ? )

Reflective practice

Take some time out to consider an interaction that didn’t go how you wanted it to go.  Think about what that felt like for the other person.  Do you think they felt heard? Years ago, when I was in the civil service, and much was done in a bureaucratic way, I often said the managers I respected were those who let me put my point of view.  They didn’t have to accept it – if they acknowledged my point, but said they wanted something done differently regardless of my points, I would accept that – they were the boss, and I was happy to accept that sometimes they would make a decision I didn’t agree with.  And this was before I understood, or had even heard of, emotional intelligence.  The managers I rebelled against were the ones I felt didn’t listen. It’s important to acknowledge another viewpoint, even if you have reasons for not changing your stance.  If you can explain those reasons, so much the better.  For empathy to be effective, the other party has to feel your empathy.  It’s no good if you didn’t communicate it effectively.

Watch for hidden cues

Sometimes people say one thing, but don’t really feel it.  Learn to watch for incongruence, saying yes and shaking the head no, for example. It may not be in the gestures or facial expressions, it may be in the tone of voice.  Agreeing to something in a tone of voice that’s not very convincing, shows no enthusiasm. Pick up on these – ask what’s holding them back, what misgivings do they have?  Be prepared though, for people still not to give you the full information.  Sometimes they might not be fully aware themselves what the problem is, and sometimes they may not be ready to share it, or want to share it with you.  It’s all a work in progress though, as you develop your skill in communicating your empathy, others will grow to trust you more and be more ready to be honest with you.

Get a tailored report from Talent Smart 

If you buy the Bradberry and Greaves book, it includes a code for an online assessment, which gives you resources and advice for the skills you need to improve. (I have no affiliation to Talent Smart, just think it's a useful book.)

Get a coach 

Whilst you can ask a trusted friend or colleague to mentor you or give you honest feedback, and possibly even help you by picking up on times you could do better, there is no subsititute for coaching.

​So what will you do next?

​Let me know in the comments below - stating it gives it substance, and we can hold you accountable.

 

[1] Daniel Goleman. ‘What makes a leader?’ The Essentials, Harvard Business Review Press, Boston Massachusetts 2011

[2] Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves. Emotional Intelligence 2.0, Talent Smart, San Diego 2009

People standing on pavement

What can improv teach us about work?

In her book ‘How to have a great day at work’ Caroline Webb suggests that a technique of improvisational comedy is a good way to give brain friendly feedback.  ‘Yes, and….’ instead of ‘Yes, but…’ fosters collaboration and helps bring out the best in others.

Ever since I read this, I’ve been intrigued to learn more about improv.  Facebook must have known this, because they kept telling me about a local course, starting soon.  I signed up.

I mean, I love my books but some things you can’t learn from a book, you’ve got to get out in the real world, meet real new people and do new things.  I thought this would be fun.  A little bit out of my comfort zone – I once did a short stand up comedy course, ending with a showcase performance.  That was a bit scary, but I rehearsed and knew my routine.  Improv – well, that’s a whole different ball game, but I thought it would be fun, so what the hell?

It is not what I expected.  I don’t know what I expected, but this wasn’t it.  On our second meeting, we were asked to stare into someone’s eyes for two minutes and imagine their life.  I knew next to nothing about these people.  One guy (they are mostly guys, only one other woman, although the trainer is a young woman) the only thing I know about him is that he’d just been accepted onto a wimp to warrior MMA training programme.   I don’t know what that is, but it sounds serious.  Another guy, the only thing I knew about him is that he’s autistic and didn’t like the light in the room we were in.  And the third guy, I know his name, but that’s about it.  But then I eased into it a bit and started making stuff up.  Which I think is what we were meant to do.

We also created a soundscape.  For those of you who don’t know what that is – and again, I didn’t – it involves sitting in an outward facing circle, in the dark, with our eyes closed, making noises.  Mostly copying other people’s noises, but occasionally dropping in a new one.  Now, ask me to stand up in front of an audience to speak and I’m good to go.  But you want me to sit in the dark, with my eyes closed, amongst strangers, and make funny noises? Seriously? Do I have to?

We also learned the ‘Yes, and…’ technique.  Whatever someone said, you had to accept it and build on it.  I got involved in drug smuggling in Colombia and found I had an alcohol problem on holiday in the Caribbean.  I think there were drugs there too.  (We’re new, not sure we had the right idea.)

You might be wondering why I’m telling you all this.  Well, even though I’d started out with the knowledge that improv could foster collaboration at work and bring out the best in others I was nevertheless surprised at the life lessons in the first two classes. Here’s a few of the things I learned.

It’s always your turn

You don’t leave it to someone else, be proactive, participate and remember it’s always your turn.  How useful is this at work? Ever work in one of those places (public sector is good at this) where people take the attitude ‘I’m not doing that, it’s not my job’? How much better would it be if everyone had everyone’s back, and just jumped in and did what’s necessary?

Make the other person look good

They may come out with something completely random or out of character – I mean, do you think I’d actually get involved in drug smuggling?  But it’s been said, so work with it, and make the other person look good.

Imagine if everyone at your workplace used this principle, that they always had to make everyone else look good?  There wouldn’t be problems of people taking credit for others’ ideas, because everyone would be focusing on making their managers, their team members and their colleagues look good. The level of collaboration would sky rocket, and so would productivity.

Let it go

I discovered I have a problem letting things go.  I’ve never considered myself a control freak.  I’m usually the one suggesting other people let it go.  Driving for example, and some idiot cuts in front, others get all worked up, honking and swearing at the other driver.  I’m the one saying you’re only winding yourself up, let it go.

But when we start to take turns adding bits to a story, I was really frustrated if someone didn’t say what I thought they should.  I did not like giving up the control to others or letting go of the outcome.

Autonomy at work is a key driver of motivation, so if you’re a manager finding it difficult to give up control, you’re stifling your team. Like me, you’re going to have to learn to let it go.

Empathy

I found the exercises helped to develop empathy.  Even though I was making it up, I felt empathy for the people whose eyes I sat staring into.  And it also made me want to know more about them. It was good to develop some curiosity about someone else, especially if you’re the kind of person who doesn’t naturally consider things from someone else’s perspective.  Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes at work would get rid of much conflict.

It was a difficult exercise to do, I totally get that this is a bit full on for work, and not everyone would be comfortable throwing themselves into this.   But (ah damn, I said ‘but’!) if you can at least stop and consider someone else’s position before reacting, then working relationships will be smoother.

Listening skills

Are you a good listener?  An active listener? Too often, we’re not fully listening to what someone else is saying, we’re waiting for our turn to speak.

Feeling heard is a powerful motivator.  Disempowered people often feel that their concerns aren’t being heard, and at work this can lead to resentment, which in turn leads to low motivation, and then low productivity.  Even just on a practical level, if you’re not listening to problems that others at work are experiencing, you’re also shutting off possible solutions

Dance group teamwork

I’m not suggesting all workplaces introduce courses in improvisational comedy – though that could be fun – but it doesn’t hurt to borrow techniques that can improve your day at work.

What do you think?  Is there a particular behaviour you could improve to make things better at work?

Walking

How to make friends at work

When Gallup created their poll into engagement at work, they added a question about whether you had a friend at work. Critics said it wasn't a useful question, but Gallup stood firm. Their poll consistently shows that having a friend at work is a good indicator of engaged employees.

In The Best Place to Work, Ron Friedman said the keys to lasting workplace relationships are proximity, familiarity, similarity and self disclosure.  And our old friend reciprocity pops up again.  Friedman quotes from the research

​The Best Place to Work

​Ron Friedman

If you want two people to connect … factual exchanges aren’t enough.  What you need is for people to reveal intimate information about themselves in a reciprocal fashion.  Having one person talk and the other listen won’t get the job done, it will leave one person feeling exposed. …both partners need to self disclose.  ​


​Friedman also states that the more frequently colleagues talked about non work matters, the closer they tended to be.

But obviously trying to force this doesn’t work.  Self disclosure has to be done naturally and over time.  Setting up ‘team building’ days where everyone is expected to share experiences can alienate some people.  I well remember being forced to stand in a circle for group singing, which I hated.  I also remember the mother of my daughter’s friend blurting out to my mother in law she’d just come back from the marriage guidance counseller – within minutes of meeting my mom in law! I mean, I hardly knew the woman, it was oversharing to tell me. 

That’s why shared activities can be useful.  The after work drinks might be one way to do this, but isn’t always practical for everyone, if they have domestic or other commitments to get to.  So what about a shared lunch? Or a walk during the lunch break.  A friend told me that at one place she used to work, someone would get a quiz book, and they’d spend 15 minutes or so answering quiz questions. It wasn’t a pre planned thing, someone would just bring the book out.  But you could have an inter team quiz scheduled.  Make a small charge for charity and you’re helping someone out, so a double win.  Don’t make it an inter team event, but say that all teams must have a mix of members from other departments, and you’re spreading the love even further. Another example I heard of is a group yoga session after work.  If you have a suitable space, you could all chip in and pay for a group teacher.

If you’re the manager and you can find a small budget for one or more of these activities, it’s a great way to foster team spirit and wellbeing for not much outlay.

Even if you’re not the manager, and there’s no budget, you can initiate something.  Make it something you like to do, and you’ll be more motivated to organise it on a regular basis.  Don’t force it – if it’s something you enjoy, hopefully there will be others who enjoy the same activity.  If one doesn’t work, try something else.  Take ideas from other places you’ve worked, what worked there?  Join in if someone else organises something – the support you offer will also help you to develop the relationship.

 Leave a comment below – what’s worked for you to help you create friendships at work?


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