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Support, positive intent

Can we find the postive intent?

What do we mean by positive intent?  I was reminded this week of the importance of belonging, and feeling like people have your back.  I said a few weeks back that the principles of improv include making sure your colleagues look good.  It embraces looking after them, making sure they are ok. It was a perfect chance to see this in action, because we did our first live performance this week, a showcase in front of family and friends.  Not a work situation, but I can see the parallels.

L'esprit de l'escalier

At times, I was a bit like a rabbit in the headlights.  I’m a little slow to catch onto ideas, so often I didn’t know how to react.  That French phrase, l’esprit de l’escalier, oh my goodness, how many of those have I had? When you think of the funny response on the way out.  But actually, there were also some that I had there and then, but wasn’t quick enough to jump in, and someone moved the action on. I found myself frustrated that I’d got a potentially funny story line, but lost the chance to use it.

Audience members amongst my friends said that a couple of the performers dominated.  There are some big personalities involved.  I also heard that one of the performers was upset about this, though I was not witness to the discussion they had.

I just wanted to share some of my feelings about the experience, and to examine my responses a bit more closely.

Belonging

There have been moments where I didn’t quite feel like I belonged.  I’m older than everyone else, and that doesn’t usually bother me.  Some friendships have been forged, meeting up at the weekend, sharing stories of dating and how that’s going. I’ve been married for donkey’s years and I’m a grandma, so obviously that social life is not for me. Some in jokes have developed amongst the lads, and I didn’t always feel included with those.

On the other hand, there were others who I really bonded with, and the tutor was always supportive and encouraging to those of us who were less confident in our ability to perform. I really liked a couple of the guys (I liked them all to be honest, even with the factors I just mentioned) and found them to be supportive too – I definitely felt that a couple of them went out of their way to help me.  There was only one other woman on the course, aside from the tutor, so we three were outnumbered by seven men.  Again, that wasn’t an issue, but I felt that the other woman also made an effort to include me, even though we are quite different personalities and she is much younger.

But then the actual performance brought up some issues.  Like I said, I was a rabbit in the headlights for much of the time. My dominant feeling afterwards was to be annoyed at myself for missing opportunities.  And then I felt bad too, because that meant I didn’t pick up on something someone else had said, even after he had taken a risk to say it. So in addition, I feel I let him down. I’m trying to be kind to myself and accept that this was the first time I’d done this live in front of an audience, but I’m still annoyed at myself.

Then others commented on the team dynamics, about people who dominated.  At first, I agreed with their perception, that a couple of people had kind of taken over.  There were times when someone rushed in, and I didn’t have the chance to take the direction I wanted to. 

I could have been annoyed about this, resenting how they took over.  But, using my developing empathy skills, let’s think about it from their point of view.  They may have been worried that the performance would go wrong, the story would get stuck.  They may have been worried that I would be stood on stage, in front of a live audience, and not know what to say, would freeze on stage.  I’d certainly frozen enough times in the weeks leading up to the show.

Positive intent

So instead of resenting them for not letting me go ahead, if I view their actions as having a positive intent, they were working to save me (and possibly one or two of the other participants) from the embarrassment of ‘dying’ on stage. Maybe they were doing what they thought was right to look after me.

I haven’t had the chance to debrief the show with them, so I have no idea what the other participants thought. I would really love to have the opportunity to talk to the guy who was upset about how it had gone.  I hope I’d be able to help him see that it wasn’t done deliberately to thwart him, but that the other person had their own concerns and was trying to help in the best way they knew how.

But if we continue with a work analogy, if someone behaves in a way that annoys you, can you reframe it, and think what their positive intent may have been?  Maybe they have anxieties of their own causing them to act in that way?  We’re going our separate ways now, but if it’s an ongoing working relationship, it’s worth the effort to look for the positive intent.  The choice is yours.  If you assume they’re out to get you, you’re building up negative feelings.  This obviously has a negative impact on you, but research consistently shows that negativity breeds negativity.  No-one likes sharing office space with a complainer.  If you assume they were trying to help you, you’ll be positively disposed towards them.  In return, they’ll like being around you, and continue to support you.

Team relationships

I get that I’ve not really made a central point here, probably because my own feelings are so entangled and it’s recent events, so I’m still trying to work it out.  We were effectively like a new team, so the relationships are also at the early stages.  It’s natural that we would get along more easily with some than others, and unavoidable I guess that there would be more than one grouping amongst us.

Annie McKee, in ‘How to be happy at work’ talks about how important friendships are at work, and how organisations can foster a spirit of openness and trust that allows friendships to develop.  The improv course did everything it could to facilitate this.  How does your workplace do?

You can see my review of ‘How to be happy at work’ here.

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

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