fbpx
Learn to be happy at work

Can you really learn to be happier at work?

Can you really learn to be happier at work? Without changing your job? Even if you have a difficult boss?

You hate Mondays....
​You're enjoying life at the weekends, but then Sunday afternoon comes around, the evening approaches, and you start to think about Monday. You get that sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach. Maybe you can't sleep. Monday morning, you don't want to get out of bed, you start to work out if you can come up with a good excuse not to go in. But you threw a sickie only last week.  Perhaps you can say the kids are sick and you’ll work from home? But you know the boss doesn’t like you working from home, so even that’s not without its stresses.

​You're bored when you get there...
The work is unfulfilling, you have no control over what you do, you just have to do as you're told. The boss is a control freak and micromanages even the simplest task.  She seems to constantly worry that you don’t know how to do your work properly or seems afraid that you might use some initiative and not to the job exactly how she wants.  So you feel there’s no point in showing any initiative anyway.

Maybe you're overworked and stressed, and can never get on top of what you have to do.  Always firefighting, dealing with the most pressing problem and never planning ahead.  So you always feel like there’s things outstanding, no sense of achievement or a job completed well.

​You don't like your boss or your colleagues...
​Your boss doesn’t have your back, he never gives you any help, just keeps piling it on. He expects you to get through it all and doesn't care if you have to stay late. Then there's your colleagues. Always bitching and gossiping. No-one works as a team, there's no sense of a shared purpose.

How on earth can you learn to be happier in these circumstances?

Mindset. Not ‘think positive’, but mindset. 

I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with positive thinking self help books; that skill of always putting a positive spin on things? Sometimes it’s really hard.  But by making small adjustments to the way I think about myself, my skills and my situation, I’ve learned so much about mindset and how important it is.  Viktor Frankl in a concentration camp experienced at first hand how much difference this makes to survival. Buckingham and Goodall in Nine Lies about Work encourage us to find the ‘red threads’ in our daily lives, and weave more of them into the fabric of our work.  Zig Ziglar tells of the woman who complained about how awful her place of work was, but by getting her to focus on gratitude showed how ‘everyone else’ had changed. (It can be found on YouTube, but most have foreign captions. Search for Zig Ziglar and gratitude if you want to watch him.)

I was talking with Michael, who worked for a local authority office.  He had hated the work and didn’t get on with his managers.  Public expenditure cuts meant the working environment was very negative. One day, in a flash of personal insight, he decided to stop complaining about it and see what he could do to make things better. To look for solutions instead of expecting others to change. He said it took some time, but after a while he found he was enjoying his work more. He discovered a growing respect for his managers, who also started to show him more respect.  His managers started to come to him for help, which led to him getting more interesting work, and they started to show him more appreciation.

It’s kind of like when two people fall out, who is going to apologise first?  Do you hold on to a grudge and expect the other party to make the first move?  If they’re doing exactly the same, no-one does it, and the rift grows.  If you want to be shown some appreciation and respect at work, show some to your bosses and your colleagues first. If you want interesting work, demonstrate that you can be trusted to do the simple things well, without complaint, on time. Change your approach, and people will change their behaviour in response.

I’m not saying this will work 100% in every situation.  There are some work situations that need more.  A bullying manager.  A severe micro manager. A ‘rules are rules’ approach.  But even in severe situations, acceptance of the situation puts you in a stronger position to act.  If you have a bullying manager you do need support, but accepting the situation and not embracing victimhood will mean that you can consider your options – go to HR, go to another manager, look for another job, leave.

In most cases though, it’s not a bullying manager, it’s more that you don’t see eye to eye, you don’t get on, you don’t respect or trust each other.  Those things can all be worked on.

And the bottom line is, you can’t control someone else’s behaviour, but you can control your own.  You can learn to control your responses and your emotions.  If you want to know where to start, download seven things you can do today to be happier at work. These seven simple things can be implemented easily. Make a start on your new habits and new behaviour at work.

Let me know if you’ve tried any of these out, and how you get on.

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

follow me on:

Leave a Comment: