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Category Archives for Gratitude

Learn to be happy at work

Can you really learn to be happier at work?

Can you really learn to be happier at work? Without changing your job? Even if you have a difficult boss?

You hate Mondays....
​You're enjoying life at the weekends, but then Sunday afternoon comes around, the evening approaches, and you start to think about Monday. You get that sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach. Maybe you can't sleep. Monday morning, you don't want to get out of bed, you start to work out if you can come up with a good excuse not to go in. But you threw a sickie only last week.  Perhaps you can say the kids are sick and you’ll work from home? But you know the boss doesn’t like you working from home, so even that’s not without its stresses.

​You're bored when you get there...
The work is unfulfilling, you have no control over what you do, you just have to do as you're told. The boss is a control freak and micromanages even the simplest task.  She seems to constantly worry that you don’t know how to do your work properly or seems afraid that you might use some initiative and not to the job exactly how she wants.  So you feel there’s no point in showing any initiative anyway.

Maybe you're overworked and stressed, and can never get on top of what you have to do.  Always firefighting, dealing with the most pressing problem and never planning ahead.  So you always feel like there’s things outstanding, no sense of achievement or a job completed well.

​You don't like your boss or your colleagues...
​Your boss doesn’t have your back, he never gives you any help, just keeps piling it on. He expects you to get through it all and doesn't care if you have to stay late. Then there's your colleagues. Always bitching and gossiping. No-one works as a team, there's no sense of a shared purpose.

How on earth can you learn to be happier in these circumstances?

Mindset. Not ‘think positive’, but mindset. 

I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with positive thinking self help books; that skill of always putting a positive spin on things? Sometimes it’s really hard.  But by making small adjustments to the way I think about myself, my skills and my situation, I’ve learned so much about mindset and how important it is.  Viktor Frankl in a concentration camp experienced at first hand how much difference this makes to survival. Buckingham and Goodall in Nine Lies about Work encourage us to find the ‘red threads’ in our daily lives, and weave more of them into the fabric of our work.  Zig Ziglar tells of the woman who complained about how awful her place of work was, but by getting her to focus on gratitude showed how ‘everyone else’ had changed. (It can be found on YouTube, but most have foreign captions. Search for Zig Ziglar and gratitude if you want to watch him.)

I was talking with Michael, who worked for a local authority office.  He had hated the work and didn’t get on with his managers.  Public expenditure cuts meant the working environment was very negative. One day, in a flash of personal insight, he decided to stop complaining about it and see what he could do to make things better. To look for solutions instead of expecting others to change. He said it took some time, but after a while he found he was enjoying his work more. He discovered a growing respect for his managers, who also started to show him more respect.  His managers started to come to him for help, which led to him getting more interesting work, and they started to show him more appreciation.

It’s kind of like when two people fall out, who is going to apologise first?  Do you hold on to a grudge and expect the other party to make the first move?  If they’re doing exactly the same, no-one does it, and the rift grows.  If you want to be shown some appreciation and respect at work, show some to your bosses and your colleagues first. If you want interesting work, demonstrate that you can be trusted to do the simple things well, without complaint, on time. Change your approach, and people will change their behaviour in response.

I’m not saying this will work 100% in every situation.  There are some work situations that need more.  A bullying manager.  A severe micro manager. A ‘rules are rules’ approach.  But even in severe situations, acceptance of the situation puts you in a stronger position to act.  If you have a bullying manager you do need support, but accepting the situation and not embracing victimhood will mean that you can consider your options – go to HR, go to another manager, look for another job, leave.

In most cases though, it’s not a bullying manager, it’s more that you don’t see eye to eye, you don’t get on, you don’t respect or trust each other.  Those things can all be worked on.

And the bottom line is, you can’t control someone else’s behaviour, but you can control your own.  You can learn to control your responses and your emotions.  If you want to know where to start, download seven things you can do today to be happier at work. These seven simple things can be implemented easily. Make a start on your new habits and new behaviour at work.

Let me know if you’ve tried any of these out, and how you get on.

Author with newborn granddaughter

Birthdays – a time for reflection

Birthdays - a time for reflection. Last year, I was horrified about being 60, it seemed so grown up. In my head, I’m still a teenager.  I laugh at fart jokes and swear words, (swear words are funny, ok?) my husband’s dad jokes on Facebook, daft things with my kids and five year old grandson. I still love rock music, including some new (ish) stuff, although I’m hopelessly out of touch with what’s new.  I will get up and dance round my handbag at a family do. Yes, I know teenagers don’t do that any more, but that’s what I did, so it counts.

The last few years my birthday has been overshadowed because it is also the date we lost my much loved mother in law. I’m thinking today too about my own mom, who passed away at the age of 60. So I’m relieved to have made it to 61.

Counting my blessings

In the last year I’ve taken up weight training, photography and improvisational comedy. I’ve lost three stones – more than 40 lbs - and can now walk further than the length of my local High St without needing to lie down for a rest.

I’m enjoying working on developing a business, and I think, after all these years, I’ve cured myself of procrastination 😆

I have a wonderful family who I love so much; a husband who loves me and has supported me for 40 years of marriage.  A grown up son who’s worked hard to gain his engineering qualifications and I’m immensely proud of.   A daughter and son in law, who are lovely parents to two beautiful children, my five year old grandson and his new baby sister.

I’m blessed with lovely extended family and supportive friends. Sisters, brothers, their families, the in laws, with all their aunts, uncles, cousins, first cousins once removed, second cousins…. There are hundreds of them.  And we get to see and spend time with a fair few.  Not often, but when we do, it’s usually joyous.  Friends, old and new, people I worked with years ago, people I’ve met more recently, people who support other solopreneurs and entrepreneurs. 

So this year, instead of cursing about my age, I’ve decided to be grateful I’m still here, getting older, loving life. I’ve been talking about gratitude as a great way to improve your mood and positivity for a while now.  But something about today just made me properly feel it.

​62nd year, bring it on

And then, the universe came knocking

​It’s usually my husband who goes in for meaningful reflective posts on Facebook, but today it just seemed right, so I posted something similar to this in my timeline.  I was in a great mood, fully happy with life.  And then, just when I didn’t need a reminder of how life is short, the universe sent me one anyway.

I’d just got home from a walk, sat down with a cup of fruit tea while deciding what tasks to do next, when there was a knock at the door.  A neighbour stood there.  He’s lived across the road from me for almost the whole time we’ve been in this house, more than thirty years.  His daughter is the same age as my son, we used to walk to school together with her and her mom.  He said his wife died on Monday.  She was 56 years of age.

They’d had so much to look forward to. Two years earlier, they had sold their house and were planning to move to a village in the countryside.  It all fell apart when she collapsed suddenly one night and suffered brain damage.  ​For the past two years, she had needed full time care, unable to speak, eat, walk or do anything for herself.  And now she’s gone.  Her daughter’s baby girl will never know her nanna growing up.  There will be no mother of the bride at the wedding later this year. My neighbour has lost the happy retirement in the countryside they had both planned.

We weren’t close friends – we’d not really spent much time together since those walks to school, somehow our friendship didn’t develop into a close one and we drifted in different directions when there was no reason to spend time together.  So in one respect, it won’t leave a hole in my life. But my word, what a shock.  Even though I knew her quality of life wasn’t there, even though her husband recognised that, I can’t help but feel for him and his family. Such a personal tragedy. 

And I know these things happen all the time, there are countless personal tragedies happening daily. I lost my parents many years ago.  We all know people who’ve lost people, fathers to cancer, mothers to strokes, partners to pneumonia, even people who have lost children.  But there was something about the way I was feeling yesterday, remembering my mom perhaps, and feeling relieved that I’m still here even though she’d died aged 60, this news hit me like a cold shower. It was the starkest of stark reminders that we don’t know what tomorrow will bring, we need to be grateful for the good things we have in life, and don’t waste it on stuff that doesn’t matter.  And definitely, don’t live for retirement.  You can’t guarantee that you’ll have one.

​Loving life

It was also a reminder of how much I do have to be thankful for.  I probably love my life now more than I ever have.  I’ve counted my blessings above, so I won’t go over them again.  But I will say one more thing; if there are things in your life you wish were different, don’t waste any more time wishing, take action.  Do something.  And I’ve said many times before, I know how hard that is, those habits are so ingrained; sometimes we even know we’re doing something from habit, but still carry on ​despite knowing it’s hurting us.

Start small.  I’ve said this before; start small. If you don’t know how, this post will give you some ideas. Or this one.

Start even smaller by leaving me a comment below, tell me what you’re grateful for today.

Man looking grateful

What have you got to be grateful for?

​Gratitude is the healthiest emotion.  If you dwell on the negative, the brain reinforces those negative emotions.  The good news is that you can change how your brain thinks.

Have you ever said, 'That's how I am, I can't change'? Science used to believe this, with our limited knowledge of how the brain works.  We used to think that our personality was fixed, our characteristics were fixed. But research has come on in leaps and bounds over the last few years, and understanding of the brain has changed significantly.

I’m no scientist, but I’ve read many, many books on thinking, behaviour and habits.  I’ve often come across this idea of neuroplasticity – the idea that we can change the neural pathways in our brains. Jane Ransom, in her TEDx talk, says that exercising gratitude physically remaps the brain, reforms the subconscious mind.

You can watch the TEDx talk here

https://youtu.be/ewi0qlqrshE

To be effective it requires three elements

  • Emote
  • Extend
  • Exercise

Emote

Feel the emotion of being grateful, really connect with it

Extend

Extend your gratitude to the people in your life.  Family, friends, loved ones.  For the purposes of improving things at work, extend your gratitude to those who help you at work, a colleague you’ve become friends with, a manager who helped you get promoted, someone who’s helped you learn a new task….  Even a little thing, someone who made you a coffee today, or gave you a smile as you arrived.

Exercise

Like physical exercise strengthens our muscles, a gratitude exercise strengthens those new neural pathways.   Ransom suggests a minimum of two weeks; I think that for the benefits to remain, the exercise needs to be more ongoing.  However, it does seem that even two weeks can help you feel happier.  Maybe a couple of times a week once the pathways have been set up? But every day to start with.

Ransom gives some examples from her own life of how this has helped her.  Let me share a story about someone I‘m close to (no names to preserve the confidentiality).  She has long had a very negative attitude towards life.  Hated her job – or specifically the management and how they treated her. But was also quite negative in other areas of her life.  I persuaded her to start a gratitude journal, which she did, and kept up for a year writing three things every day.  I’ve noticed the difference in the way she encourages others to be less critical of themselves, and often makes supportive comments.  This is such a turnaround from the previous habit of commiserating with others, moaning about life.  They say misery loves company, and it so easy to fall into the trap of agreeing that life is unfair.  But focusing on what she’s grateful for has helped her to be less critical of others, less down about herself and happier in life.

Get a nice notebook.  ​Science has shown us that our brain engages differently if we write, so you'll get more benefit if you do this. No-one need see it, it's just for you.  Start writing down three things you’re grateful for at the end of each day.  Do this for the minimum of two weeks, but I’d encourage you to keep it up, even if only two or three times a week after the initial period.  

Let me know how this goes for you in the comments below.