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Category Archives for Motivation

A journey of a thousand miles. Feet walking through rainy street

A journey of a thousand miles

A journey of 1000 miles begins with the first step.  Those ancient sayings always sound so wise don’t they?  And when it’s a literal journey, like walking the Camino de Santiago or the Great Wall of China, it’s easy enough to work out what the first step is.

But what if it’s not a literal journey? What if you’re using it as an analogy – the ‘j’ word as they call it on Strictly Come Dancing, or the journey of X Factor contestants?  Maybe even then first step isn’t so difficult to work out – accept when the BBC ask you onto Strictly, turn up for the X Factor audition. Sometimes though, the first step isn’t so obvious.  Or you find you take a step, but it doesn’t take you in the right direction.  You take the first step, but then give up before you reach your goal. (Been there, done that, got the t-shirt – so many times.)

Last year, I started my weight loss journey.  Yes, this is one of those things I’ve tried so many times and given up because it got too difficult.  This time it’s different. Yes, really.  What’s different about it is that I have learned how to overcome setbacks.  I’ve learned to keep going, even when the going gets tough, and get back on the diet and exercise horse after Christmas, birthday meals out, felt a bit down so I ate all the food….

​I might also be seeing how many cliches I can shoe horn into this post!

Stay with me on this – it might not be obvious how this helps you at work, but I’ll get to it.  First, I’d like to share with you what makes the difference this time.  My first step was to commit to exercise three times a week for eight weeks.  I made this a public pledge on stickk.com. I was doing no exercise at all.  I wore a fitbit, and I was averaging 3000 – 4500 steps a day, and doing no other type of exercise.  So I didn’t prescribe what type of exercise it had to be – going to the gym for a class, or just a gym session, or even going for a 20 minute walk.  All counted, I just had to do three in a week.

Five things made the difference for me

  • Making a public commitment
  • Making the commitment to myself
  • Starting small
  • Building on success
  • Measuring progress


Let’s look at each of these in a little more details

Making a public commitment

Owain Service and Rory Gallagher in their book, Think Small, say that making yourself publicly accountable is one of the foundations of creating good habits successfully.  Stickk.com is a great place to do this.  You can make a pledge of any kind, and get someone to check up on you.  As an added incentive, you can pledge that you will pay a fine if you don’t succeed – a donation to a cause you don’t support, direct to your referee, or to stickk.com itself.  I couldn’t even bring myself to pledge a donation to the Conservative Party as an incentive to stick to my pledge, so I went for paying the website.  In the event, however, I achieved three sessions for the full eight weeks.  But if you feel you need the extra discipline of the threat of your hard earned money going to someone you detest, the option is there!

Making the commitment to myself

The discipline of the pledge helped me without a doubt, but I’d also been reading a lot of things where a commitment to oneself kept coming up.  This resonated strongly with me, and I decided I was going to do this, exercise more, for me.  It because really important for me to follow through, whereas before, without being very specific, I frequently let myself down.

Start small

I didn’t set out to stick to a restrictive diet, do one hour classes three times a week, walk 10,000 steps a day or any other goal that would have been too much.  If I did a 20 minute walk, I counted that.  Sometimes I did 30, but I was happy if I’d done 20.  Or I did a 30 minute class. (Signing up for a class was another way I ensured I was committed.  Very useful in the early days.) Three a week was do-able.  Five, was more than a challenge, it would have been too hard.

Building on success

Achieving my exercise target gave me such a lift.  Charles Duhigg, in The Power of Habit talks about a cornerstone habit.  I always felt that regular exercise would be a cornerstone habit for me.  It encourages me to eat more healthy food, and less junk.  About four weeks in, I decided to start a low carb plan, and log food in My Fitness Pal.  But the cornerstone habit is a bit more significant than that.  Just realising that I could succeed in an area of my life I’d always struggled with made me more motivated in other areas.  I developed self discipline.  Turned down food I wanted really.  Left for the gym for early classes, leaving home at 5.40 or 6 am.  Went for a walk when it was pouring with rain and I didn’t want to.

I also discovered that My Fitness Pal gives you more calories if you’re more active, so exercise got me more food!  In just over nine months, I have lost 3 stone (42 lbs, or 19 kg)

I found that I became more self disciplined with my work projects too. Bonus.  And demonstrates the power of the cornerstone habit.

Measuring progress

In The 12 week year, Brian P Moran and Michael Lennington, set out a process for measuring your progress.  They talk about lead indicators and lag indicators.  Lag indicators are the ones we usually focus on with weight loss for example.  Have we lost weight on the scales this week? How much? Lead indicators though, help to tell as you’re going along how likely are you to achieve the lag targets.  If you need to stick to a plan of 1200 calories to lose 1lb a week (and My Fitness Pal or a Fitbit will work these things out for you) what you need to measure is whether you adhered to the plan. 

Moran and Lennington say that 85% implementation rate will usually result in success with the lag indicators. Not a precise science for everything of course, but at least you have measurements to monitor right?  You can adjust, if you are monitoring on a weekly basis.

So what’s all this got to do with being happy at work?

These five success factors can all be transferred to any goal you have in life.  If you’re not happy at work and you know you need to make a change, where do you start? What’s your first step? Starting small can have a profound effect, so I suggest you start small.

There are seven things you can do today that will help you to be happier at work.  They are all simple (though not necessarily easy) and some are very simple indeed. 

  • Say a cheerful good morning as you arrive
  • Take a basket of fruit for everyone to share
  • Give positive feedback
  • Offer to help a colleague
  • ​Start a gratitude journal
  • Operate from positive intent
  • Invite colleagues to a shared activity

You can get a download here with more about these seven things.

​Make your commitment here.  Start small, pick one.  Tell me in the comments which one, and how often you will do it.

People standing on pavement

What can improv teach us about work?

In her book ‘How to have a great day at work’ Caroline Webb suggests that a technique of improvisational comedy is a good way to give brain friendly feedback.  ‘Yes, and….’ instead of ‘Yes, but…’ fosters collaboration and helps bring out the best in others.

Ever since I read this, I’ve been intrigued to learn more about improv.  Facebook must have known this, because they kept telling me about a local course, starting soon.  I signed up.

I mean, I love my books but some things you can’t learn from a book, you’ve got to get out in the real world, meet real new people and do new things.  I thought this would be fun.  A little bit out of my comfort zone – I once did a short stand up comedy course, ending with a showcase performance.  That was a bit scary, but I rehearsed and knew my routine.  Improv – well, that’s a whole different ball game, but I thought it would be fun, so what the hell?

It is not what I expected.  I don’t know what I expected, but this wasn’t it.  On our second meeting, we were asked to stare into someone’s eyes for two minutes and imagine their life.  I knew next to nothing about these people.  One guy (they are mostly guys, only one other woman, although the trainer is a young woman) the only thing I know about him is that he’d just been accepted onto a wimp to warrior MMA training programme.   I don’t know what that is, but it sounds serious.  Another guy, the only thing I knew about him is that he’s autistic and didn’t like the light in the room we were in.  And the third guy, I know his name, but that’s about it.  But then I eased into it a bit and started making stuff up.  Which I think is what we were meant to do.

We also created a soundscape.  For those of you who don’t know what that is – and again, I didn’t – it involves sitting in an outward facing circle, in the dark, with our eyes closed, making noises.  Mostly copying other people’s noises, but occasionally dropping in a new one.  Now, ask me to stand up in front of an audience to speak and I’m good to go.  But you want me to sit in the dark, with my eyes closed, amongst strangers, and make funny noises? Seriously? Do I have to?

We also learned the ‘Yes, and…’ technique.  Whatever someone said, you had to accept it and build on it.  I got involved in drug smuggling in Colombia and found I had an alcohol problem on holiday in the Caribbean.  I think there were drugs there too.  (We’re new, not sure we had the right idea.)

You might be wondering why I’m telling you all this.  Well, even though I’d started out with the knowledge that improv could foster collaboration at work and bring out the best in others I was nevertheless surprised at the life lessons in the first two classes. Here’s a few of the things I learned.

It’s always your turn

You don’t leave it to someone else, be proactive, participate and remember it’s always your turn.  How useful is this at work? Ever work in one of those places (public sector is good at this) where people take the attitude ‘I’m not doing that, it’s not my job’? How much better would it be if everyone had everyone’s back, and just jumped in and did what’s necessary?

Make the other person look good

They may come out with something completely random or out of character – I mean, do you think I’d actually get involved in drug smuggling?  But it’s been said, so work with it, and make the other person look good.

Imagine if everyone at your workplace used this principle, that they always had to make everyone else look good?  There wouldn’t be problems of people taking credit for others’ ideas, because everyone would be focusing on making their managers, their team members and their colleagues look good. The level of collaboration would sky rocket, and so would productivity.

Let it go

I discovered I have a problem letting things go.  I’ve never considered myself a control freak.  I’m usually the one suggesting other people let it go.  Driving for example, and some idiot cuts in front, others get all worked up, honking and swearing at the other driver.  I’m the one saying you’re only winding yourself up, let it go.

But when we start to take turns adding bits to a story, I was really frustrated if someone didn’t say what I thought they should.  I did not like giving up the control to others or letting go of the outcome.

Autonomy at work is a key driver of motivation, so if you’re a manager finding it difficult to give up control, you’re stifling your team. Like me, you’re going to have to learn to let it go.

Empathy

I found the exercises helped to develop empathy.  Even though I was making it up, I felt empathy for the people whose eyes I sat staring into.  And it also made me want to know more about them. It was good to develop some curiosity about someone else, especially if you’re the kind of person who doesn’t naturally consider things from someone else’s perspective.  Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes at work would get rid of much conflict.

It was a difficult exercise to do, I totally get that this is a bit full on for work, and not everyone would be comfortable throwing themselves into this.   But (ah damn, I said ‘but’!) if you can at least stop and consider someone else’s position before reacting, then working relationships will be smoother.

Listening skills

Are you a good listener?  An active listener? Too often, we’re not fully listening to what someone else is saying, we’re waiting for our turn to speak.

Feeling heard is a powerful motivator.  Disempowered people often feel that their concerns aren’t being heard, and at work this can lead to resentment, which in turn leads to low motivation, and then low productivity.  Even just on a practical level, if you’re not listening to problems that others at work are experiencing, you’re also shutting off possible solutions

Dance group teamwork

I’m not suggesting all workplaces introduce courses in improvisational comedy – though that could be fun – but it doesn’t hurt to borrow techniques that can improve your day at work.

What do you think?  Is there a particular behaviour you could improve to make things better at work?

Walking

How to make friends at work

When Gallup created their poll into engagement at work, they added a question about whether you had a friend at work. Critics said it wasn't a useful question, but Gallup stood firm. Their poll consistently shows that having a friend at work is a good indicator of engaged employees.

In The Best Place to Work, Ron Friedman said the keys to lasting workplace relationships are proximity, familiarity, similarity and self disclosure.  And our old friend reciprocity pops up again.  Friedman quotes from the research

​The Best Place to Work

​Ron Friedman

If you want two people to connect … factual exchanges aren’t enough.  What you need is for people to reveal intimate information about themselves in a reciprocal fashion.  Having one person talk and the other listen won’t get the job done, it will leave one person feeling exposed. …both partners need to self disclose.  ​


​Friedman also states that the more frequently colleagues talked about non work matters, the closer they tended to be.

But obviously trying to force this doesn’t work.  Self disclosure has to be done naturally and over time.  Setting up ‘team building’ days where everyone is expected to share experiences can alienate some people.  I well remember being forced to stand in a circle for group singing, which I hated.  I also remember the mother of my daughter’s friend blurting out to my mother in law she’d just come back from the marriage guidance counseller – within minutes of meeting my mom in law! I mean, I hardly knew the woman, it was oversharing to tell me. 

That’s why shared activities can be useful.  The after work drinks might be one way to do this, but isn’t always practical for everyone, if they have domestic or other commitments to get to.  So what about a shared lunch? Or a walk during the lunch break.  A friend told me that at one place she used to work, someone would get a quiz book, and they’d spend 15 minutes or so answering quiz questions. It wasn’t a pre planned thing, someone would just bring the book out.  But you could have an inter team quiz scheduled.  Make a small charge for charity and you’re helping someone out, so a double win.  Don’t make it an inter team event, but say that all teams must have a mix of members from other departments, and you’re spreading the love even further. Another example I heard of is a group yoga session after work.  If you have a suitable space, you could all chip in and pay for a group teacher.

If you’re the manager and you can find a small budget for one or more of these activities, it’s a great way to foster team spirit and wellbeing for not much outlay.

Even if you’re not the manager, and there’s no budget, you can initiate something.  Make it something you like to do, and you’ll be more motivated to organise it on a regular basis.  Don’t force it – if it’s something you enjoy, hopefully there will be others who enjoy the same activity.  If one doesn’t work, try something else.  Take ideas from other places you’ve worked, what worked there?  Join in if someone else organises something – the support you offer will also help you to develop the relationship.

 Leave a comment below – what’s worked for you to help you create friendships at work?


What do you do if your manager doesn’t know how to manage?

I’m going to hazard a guess that you’ve seen ​managers who don't know how to manager, can’t motivate their staff. Maybe even worked for one. Hopefully haven’t been one, but sometimes, you know, that happens too - we can all learn to be better. Often, this is because of poor workplace culture – not always, there are cases of one off ineffective managers in good organisations, but in the main, the poor managers are a result of poor organisations in my opinion.

What if you’re unfortunate enough to find yourself working in one of the places with some of these managers? How do you deal with that? Can you change the culture by yourself, or does the culture come from the top? As a comment in a previous post asked, ‘Is this really the responsibility of the individual if they are a lone voice? … Is it the responsibility of the management, organisation or team to change the culture?’

As I’ve argued before, if you are a lone voice with no power or authority within a toxic work environment, then no, realistically, you’re not going to make a significant difference. Does this mean you shouldn’t try? If you’re stuck with the job, even for the time being, surely you want to make some effort to improve things?

I recently re-read Stephen Covey, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, and one concept that was a bit of lightbulb moment for me was reading about circle of concern vs circle of influence. I realised I’d been getting all bent out of shape over things I couldn’t impact. Brexit, Donald Trump, austerity…my circles of concern. When it would be much more beneficial and impactful if I focussed on my circles of influence – where I could make a difference.

Let’s apply this to the toxic workplace. Can you change government policy and get them to make the right investment in your public sector service, so that it can properly serve the people it claims to serve? No. (Ok, my politics might be showing a bit here)

Can you change the strategic plan your managers and leaders are working towards? Mmm, maybe, a little, but unlikely. Depends what stage it’s at.

Can you change the targets your manager wants you to work towards? Again, maybe. Put together a good argument for why the targets are unrealistic, and a proposal for revised targets. If your manager has a little wiggle room, then you may be able to get them agreed. If the culture is very poor, maybe even that wouldn’t be successful. But give it a go – you won’t know unless you try.

Can you change your manager’s behaviour towards you? Not directly, you can’t make them change.

Can you change your behaviour towards your manager? Ah, there we have it. You can change your behaviour. You can change your response to your manager’s behaviour, and that in itself might result in a change of your manager’s behaviour.

Ditto your colleagues. You can’t make them change, but you can change your behaviour towards them, and their behaviour back might just change too.

Again, none of this is simple. If it was just as simple as deciding to change, and then doing it, we all would. But we’re creatures of habit, and changing habits is really hard. I mean, really, really hard. So let’s start with some simple things, and here’s an idea you can try out.

Give a cheerful greeting. Say a cheery good morning to everyone you meet as you arrive at work. If no-one does this at your workplace, people will be surprised at first. But persist. They’ll start to reply, and slowly it will alter the atmosphere slightly. When someone asks how are you (or that Brummie greeting of ‘alright?’, where you’re just meant to say ‘alright’ back) answer ‘Fantastic thanks!’ This is really fun to do, especially if your customary answer is ‘not too bad thanks’. People will want to know why you’re feeling fantastic, you’ll develop new connections with people you’ve not really spoken to before, and it will alter your own mood – it’s tricky to feel miserable or say ‘Fantastic!’ in a glum voice. Starting in these small ways will develop into a changed way you greet people generally, and you will make a difference.

The more you change your behaviour and responses to others, the more you will find your circle of influence grows.

Try this for a week, and let me know in the comments section how you get on. What difference has it made?

Want more tips like these?  Download 7 things you can do to make work better today​

Man working late

Stressed at work? #WorldMentalHealthDay

World Mental Health day today then.  It’s trending on Twitter under three different hashtags, several more on Instagram, Linked In has articles on it, people are posting memes on Facebook.  I’ve also had emails on it, telling me what organisations are doing to raise awareness of mental health issues.

This is all very well, and I’m not saying it won’t help for people to be more aware and more sensitive to the issues surrounding mental illness.

But what really winds me up is organisations talking about what they’re doing to ‘raise awareness’, and what they’re not talking about is stress at work.  How much is the workplace the cause of the mental health issues their people are experiencing? Are they working in poor conditions? Too much work leading to long hours? A culture that frowns upon anyone who leaves on time or doesn’t get in extra early? Having to take work home? A micromanager? A bully for a manager?  Or management by absence?

I listened to the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce podcast today, with interviewees from two large organisations in Birmingham talking about what they’re doing about mental health.  Apart from a mention that work addiction is an addiction too, there was nothing about the role the workplace plays in causing mental health issues.  There was a lot of talk about raising awareness.

Now these two businesses might be great places to work, but equally, they may be creating stress for their employees.  If they’re not talking about it, chances are, nothing is being done about it.  If their people have any of the issues I mentioned causing them stress at work, what are these organisations doing to address that problem? Are there genuine solutions available to them, and are they encouraged to take them up?

Birmingham Chamber also says that poor mental health and wellbeing is costing the West Midlands region more than £12 billion a year. The CIPD’s annual survey into health and wellbeing at work shows that stress is one of the top three causes of long term absences across all sectors, and the top cause of long term absence in the public and non-profit sectors. So it really doesn’t pay to ignore this issue.

One exception I did find on Twitter is Prof Sir Cary Cooper, speaking at the Mad World conference. He says that employers need to identify what could be damaging workers’ wellbeing, instead of looking for quick fixes like mindfulness at lunch.  Prof Cooper is a professor of organisational psychology and health at MBS Manchester University, so has some authority to make these observations.  Although it’s so obvious that if people are overworked for long periods of time, they’ll get stressed, and that will eventually result in sickness absence, I don’t understand why more employers don’t see this.

If you’re overworked and it’s having an effect on your mental health, I recommend you read How to do a great job and go home on time by Fergus O’Connell.  It has some great strategies to deal with this problem.  This book review tells you a little more about it.

You can also join my 30 day challenge to change how you feel about work.

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​O’Connell, Fergus 2005 ​How to do a great job and go home on time ​Pearson Education Limited, Harlow​​​

Very blurry picture I took with my phone of Gary Vee on stage

Whose life is it anyway?

​Who’s in control? Whose dream are you living?

Work hard, get a good job and you’ll be a success.  But now you feel you’ve bought into a lie. You work hard, but aren’t getting the rewards you deserve.

Entrepreneurship is a pretty big thing now, more and more people getting into it.  I know a few people who got into freelancing or became sole traders and entrepreneurs who went into it because they wanted more control over their lives, or at least working life.

But what if you do work for someone else?  Entrepreneurship is not your thing, for whatever reason.  And let’s face it, we can’t all be entrepreneurs – business owners need someone to join the payroll.

I spent two days at an event last week, for entrepreneurs.  Headline speaker was Gary Vaynerchuk, and there were several other speakers, most of whom were selling from the stage.  But there were some lessons in there that are just as valuable to employees as those running a business.  I’ve talked before about how autonomy at work is a key driver of motivation, and these seven lessons can help you take back control.

Seven lessons to help you take back control of your working life

The system lies to you. Education is to get you to conform.  It doesn’t teach you the right things

A few speakers talked about the education system, how kids are not taught how to be entrepreneurial.  They’re taught how to get a job.  Get good grades and work hard, and you’ll be successful.  A few discovered for themselves that’s not how it works.

I’m on board with the sentiment, though it did remind me a little of Hyde in That 70s Show, who was always complaining about ‘the man’.

You may be in a role where you’re working hard, but feel you’re not getting ​any reward for all that effort.  You’re working hard for someone else’s rewards.  It’s unfortunately happening a great deal at present.

The solution? Get your own education.  Learn on your own terms.  Several speakers said you’ve got to learn before you earn.  Essentially the same message as the establishment. But what resonates for me is that we should take responsibility for our own education, career, business, life.  You may not be taught critical thinking at school, but get out there and learn to do it, it’s an important life skill. And speaking of which….

Take responsibility

This is one of my favourites.  Take responsibility for your own actions.  One woman got the opportunity to ask Gary Vee a question. She admitted she hadn’t taken any action (brave of her!) but then said she was worried about what could go wrong, what should she do then?  Gary Vee’s response ‘Don’t worry about the future when you’re doing shit in the present.’ As someone who has difficulty with productivity at times, I can empathise with her question, but he’s absolutely right.  The responsibility to take action lies with ourselves.

If you’re in a horrible job, or have a bad manager, take responsibility for changing that.  But take a good hard look at your role here.  Is it really that bad, or are you causing at least part of the problem by your attitude to work?  How engaged are you at work?  Only 11% of employees in the UK are fully engaged.  If you increase your engagement, you can increase your success.  If you increase your happiness, you can increase your success. (Yes, that is the right way round.  You increase your happiness first, the success follows.) Let me know if you want to know how to do that, I can help you.

Fix your mindset.  Get rid of limiting beliefs

This is one reason we often get caught up in not taking action.  Actually, fix your mindset is probably the wrong way to say it, what we want is to have the right mindset; there’s a fixed mindset, or a growth mindset.  Growth is the one we want.

We lack the confidence to go out and succeed in the way we’d like to.  This is a part of the education you need to get for yourself.  If you don’t know how to do it, find out. A great place to start is by reading Mindset by Carol Dweck.  Or watch her TED talk if you don’t like reading. (It’s an excellent book though, I’d recommend giving it a try.)

The power of believing you can improve – Carol Dweck

Take action

Execute. Stop consuming, start producing. Knowledge isn’t power, knowledge plus action is power.  Be knowledgeable about your job, but ultimately, you have to produce the goods.

As a long suffering procrastinator, knowledge plus action makes so much sense.  Never forget there has to be action.  It’s only action that moves us forward, inaction leads to atrophy. (That might not be literally correct, I’m not a scientist.  But Prof Brian Cox said something similar I’m sure.)

If, like me, you’ve been afflicted with procrastination, take responsibility.  There are solutions that can help – I’ve been using them myself and am recovering.

Seize the day

Kind of like the last one, take action, sometimes you have to seize the day.  I’m so thankful I booked onto this event.  It was two days away from my business, travel expenses as well as the ticket expense, and two 4 am starts. But it was totally worth it.

Apart from the awesomeness of having seen Gary Vaynerchuk speak live on stage, I got so much more from this experience that I wasn’t expecting.  Sometimes, it’s worth just going with your gut and doing something, even if it doesn’t seem logical.

So if you just know you need to do something, just do it.

Get a coach or a mentor

What, you haven’t got one already? Just, get a coach. Or a mentor. Or both.

Look for the hidden lessons

Many thanks to Daniel Priestley, who was one of the speakers, for helping me to think more about the experience overall, and for the hidden lessons.  I learned some things about myself I wasn’t expecting to, and his comments made me learn some more.

I don’t want to come over all inspirational quote here, but those memes on Facebook that tell you people come into your life for a reason? And sometimes there’re there to bring you a lesson?  That’s how I feel about going to this event.   I know we can’t go through life analysing every little thing that happens, but it can be worthwhile to reflect on experiences from time to time.  The lessons may not be the ones you expected.

So if you’re having a tough time at work, would you like to

  • get your own education
  • take responsibility
  • change your mindset and get rid of limiting beliefs
  • take action
  • seize the day
  • find the hidden lessons?

Then join my 30 day challenge to change how you feel about work.  It starts next Monday.

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Try this to change how you feel about work

New 30 day challenge to change how you feel about work.

Join the challenge now

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How was your weekend?

How was your weekend?  I hope you managed to chill out, relax, do something you love, with people you love.  And more to the point, are you looking forward to a good week at work?

Too many people experience that Sunday evening dread, multiplied at the moment by summer’s over depression. If back to work isn’t an exciting prospect, we’re now counting down the days till Christmas, when we get the next break from work.

I’ve always felt that’s no way to live life. Work is such an important part of our identity, as well as a significant chunk of where we spend our time. It’s a tragedy if you don’t love it, and unfortunately too many people don’t love it. Gallup polls consistently show that only around 13-15% of people worldwide are engaged at work. In the UK it’s an even more dismal 11%. They define engaged as ‘highly involved in and enthusiastic about their work and workplace. They are psychological ‘owners’, drive performance and innovation, and move the organization forward.’ Does this sound like you?  If so, congratulations on being part of an elite 11% of the working population.

Even worse, 21% of UK workers are actively disengaged, meaning they are resentful and acting out their unhappiness at work.  They are not just going through the motions, doing the minimum they need to hang on to their jobs, but may be undermining the work of others by expressing how much they hate being there.

Which one are you? Highly involved and enthusiastic about work? Living for the weekend and counting down the days till Christmas? Or worse, dreading the prospect of another week at work?

If you’re less than happy, and want to make a change to how you feel, join my 30 day challenge.

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Trust and productivity – are they related?

Some studies have been reported in the HR press this week, I share my thoughts about a couple of statistics.

 

 

Links here to the reports mentioned

CIPD Labour market outlook Aug 2018

Senior management are the least trusted in the workplace

 

 

 

achievement-adult-agreement-1376864

How to develop and grow trust

​Last week's post told Jeanette's story, and showed how untrustworthy managers can cause problems.  

​What can be done in this situation?

Firstly, it does fall to this manager to be willing to look at his behaviour and determine to develop his skills and alter his approach. Or it falls to his managers to encourage him, or get rid of him.  But let’s suppose he is willing to change.  How can he develop the trust of his team?

Stephen Covey, in The Speed of Trust, says that it can be done, even though it is tougher to regain trust once lost.

There are four elements – two relate to character, two relate to competence, and all four rely on each other.

The four elements are

​Character

  • Integrity
  • Intent

​Competence

  • Capability
  • ​Results

Let’s look at what each of these mean.

​Integrity

Doing the right thing – even if no-one is watching. Integrity is more than honesty, it’s also congruence, humility and courage.  After Gandhi spoke for two hours without notes to the House of Commons, his secretary said ‘What Gandhi thinks, what he says, what he feels, are all the same.’  And it’s important to have the courage to do the right thing, even when it’s difficult.

​Intent

We all make mistakes.  But what’s important is our intent. If we believe that someone’s intent is to help, do good, then we will feel we can trust them.  But if we don’t trust their intent, how can we trust them?  Using the example above, if we think the manager’s intent in yelling at his junior staff member was to help them learn (alright, that’s a stretch, but if he was normally helpful, and this was out of character, then we might accept that the telling off was meant to help her not to do it again) and we would still have trust for the manager. But if we know the other stuff about him, we’ll believe the roasting will be to protect his own ​behind, and that he has no interest in actually helping his team member to develop and grow. And the mistrust is what will develop and grow.

​Capability

Moving on to competence, we will not trust someone who we don’t think can do what we expect them to do. You might trust your GP for example.  But if she then says you need open heart surgery, and she will do it for you, you’re unlikely to trust such a specialised procedure to a general practitioner with no experience in surgery.

​Results

What results have been delivered?  Moving back to the manager (I should give him a name – maybe I’ll call him Ron – Ron Manager?) what results has he delivered?  The job of a manager is to get the best out of his people.  Probably to help retain expertise for his organisation, reduce stress and sickness absence. Ron is losing people left right and centre, there’s above average sickness absence, and those that stay don’t perform very well, motivation is at an all time low.

On the other hand, a manager who has a happy and productive team obviously has their trust, and equally important, trusts his team to carry out the organisation’s purpose without looking over their shoulder, and knows they will go above and beyond when it’s needed.

If you would like to improve trust within your organisation, I’d recommend reading ‘The Speed of Trust' by Stephen Covey with Rebecca Merrill, see below for more details.

​You can also give me a call to talk about how Silvern Training can help you achieve a positive, dynamic workplace using our seven guiding principles of Pam Cast.


​Call Lindsay on 0121 624 1957

​Covey, Stephen M R and Merrill, Rebecca R ​2006. ​The Speed of Trust. Free Press, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc  ​New York

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