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Working out. Consequences urgency and procrastination

Consequences, urgency and procrastination

​I’ve been thinking a lot about consequences and urgency just lately, and the effects of procrastination.

Are you stuck in a job you don’t like, and you’d really like to make some changes, but somehow you never seem to get around to doing anything about it other than complain? I just want to say, it’s not your fault.  It’s really hard to make that change, and sometimes we don’t even know where to start.  To compound the problem, our brains conspire to keep us where we are. This ​post I wrote some time ago tells you more about how it does this.

I told you in the last post how I’d finally got the diet and exercise habit.  What I didn’t say was that this was after more than forty years of failing to adopt healthy diet and fitness habits on a sustainable basis.  So yay for me!  And that got me thinking about transferring the lessons learned into other areas, and I showed you how you could start small to make some changes in your work situation.

Consequences

I realised that the reason I’ve now adopted the new habits is because there are consequences to not sticking with it.  At first, the consequence was that I’d have to pay a fine and show on a public website that I’d not achieved my goal.  But now, several months later, the consequences of not getting in my activity for the day mean that I don’t get to eat so much.  To continue losing weight, I must maintain a calorie deficit.  If I’m active, I get more calories to eat and can still maintain a deficit on the day.  If I don’t maintain a deficit, I won’t continue losing weight, and I now know that the progress motivates me.  I don’t like to see a weight gain.  I’ve associated the behaviour with the consequences.

There are other things I’d like to achieve though, and I realised that the consequences are not sufficiently associated with the results, so I need to find a way to link them – to ingrain the new habit to work towards other goals.

Urgency

Which brings me to urgency. I’ve also always been a last minute kind of woman.  As a mature student, I was often up until 3.30 am to finish an assignment.  Once, I handed something in at one minute to the deadline, and my dissertation involved two consecutive all nighters in order to get it in on time. I did well to do two consecutive all nighters – that involved me planning ahead and doing some work two days before it was due in.

Now that I work alone, I have to create my own urgency, I have no tutor or manager expecting work to be done to a specific time, so you might have noticed that I don’t post an article every week. At the moment, I don’t have readers who expect a weekly post, so there are no immediate or obvious consequences if I miss a week. So if I say here, publicly, that I will post once a week for the next eight weeks, I will need to follow through.  (There, I’ve said it.)

You may be in a job you don’t like, you may come home and complain to your family or friends about how awful it is, and you may even look at the job ads online to see if there’s anything else out there.  But you’re not really taking action, you feel stuck in your current situation.  There’s no urgency to make the change.  You need the income ​your job provides, you’re tired out when you get back with domestic responsibilities, you don’t have time to fill out job applications online. The consequences, remaining fed up, dreading Sunday evenings and Monday mornings – well, that’s how it is, you’ll just continue to whinge about it.

Urgency can be a double edged sword.  You may eventually get to the point where you’re desperate, things are so bad that you’ll start to take action.  But then your options may be limited, and you could end up in just as bad a position or worse.  Like Brenda (not her real name) who left a public sector job because she wasn’t happy there, and took a job with a charity working for a cause she believed in.  However, she soon found that the organisation had a toxic work environment. Her new manager was someone who had been promoted but wasn’t capable of her new job, there were no support structures in place to provide the training and coaching that the manager needed, a colleague was being bullied, bitching and gossip were rife.  Speaking up got her nowhere.

You don’t want to act out of real urgency and not be able to take a considered action.  So how can you create some urgency for yourself - enough to motivate you to take consistent action and start a new habit but not so much that you have to act at all costs?

As I’ve already said, I’m finding the public accountability very helpful, combined with making a commitment to myself.  Owain Service and Rory Gallagher in their book, Think Small, support the idea that making yourself publicly accountable is one of the foundations of creating good habits successfully.

Procrastination

And then we come to procrastination.  The result of consequences not having a direct link in your mind to your current behaviour, and of not having urgency to act, is procrastination.  You know you want to do something – most likely look for another job – but you put it off. There are reasons we do this – it can be too hard to take the action we want to take, it can take up too much time, we don’t give it priority over more immediate things.  This article in the New York Times puts a different light on it, and it makes perfect sense to me.  It’s not a time management problem, it’s an emotional problem.  We don’t procrastinate because we’re lazy or because we don’t have time management skills.  It’s a response to a negative mood – the urgency of managing that negative mood takes priority over the longer term consequences.  It may just be that the task itself is unpleasant, but it may also relate to deeper feelings of self doubt, low self esteem, anxiety or insecurity. 

The article gives some useful tips on dealing with procrastination.  I’d like to add one more. Start small.  Think about your habits, and what you’d like to do differently in your working life.  You may think that finding a new job is what you want – and you may be right in the long term that’s the right course of action – but starting small means exactly that.  What else could you do? The last post had a few suggestions.  Here’s a few more – they are massive goals, but small actions to make a start.

Be more confident at work

Repeat affirmations to yourself every morning

​Be more motivated

Pick a task that you must do daily or weekly at work, where you usually struggle to get it done.  Set yourself a target – must have it done by 11.30 am every day, or by Tuesday lunchtime each week, whatever is appropriate for the task.  Make a pledge in stickk.com and ask a friend at work to be your referee

​Be more creative

Walk to work, or during your lunchbreak.  Exercise has so many more benefits than just for your body.  The time walking gives your mind the opportunity to wander, enhancing your creativity. Start with three times a week, or even once a week if you’re not active.  Walk for 20 – 30 minutes.

​Be nicer at work

Smile at people. Set a target – I must smile at five people today ? You’ll probably find you’ll soon smile at more than five.

​Learn a new skill

Block out the time to devote to it.  You can’t learn a new skill without practice.  So either go to a class, or ensure you block out the time – at work if appropriate, at home if it’s not.

​Improve working relationships

Resolve to ask one person each day how they are.  And really listen to the response – give them your time and attention. Or even resolve to do this once a week to begin with

​Be more organised

Pick one task and work on that.  As for motivation, set a target, make a pledge in stickk.com

​As well as on stickk.com, make your pledge here in the comments below, and I’ll be sure to support your efforts.  Look forward to seeing how you get on.

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

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2 comments
Claire says 5th April 2019

Great post, I’m a dreadful procrastinate, will take things on board…

Reply
    Lindsay Milner says 12th April 2019

    Thank you 🙂 Suffered a little with it myself this week, although I did have to take on grandma duties as my daughter gave birth to her second baby. Guess that’s a reason to forgive myself!

    If there’s anything in particular you’d like to work on, let me know, happy to provide some friendly support.

    Reply
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