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What are you doing to support your team?

​Why should you, as an employer, support your staff?  They are there to do something for you, and you pay them for their service, so you don’t owe them anything, right?

Well, maybe, but then what happens when you need them to go the extra mile?

I worked in charities for a long time.  I know that most of the people who work in charities do it because they love the sector, believe in making a difference for their cause, and usually are willing to work over and above their contracted hours because of this.  They also know how strapped for cash their charity is. The public’s perception is that the sector is full of highly paid executives happy to take their excessive salary at the expense of the people they are meant to be serving.  The truth is that most people are underpaid for the work they do, accept this because of their commitment to the cause, regularly attend events out of hours or work unpaid overtime.

I spoke recently to a teacher who works with teens in alternative education.  The naughty kids, she called them, though I could tell she didn’t buy into this description, she was just using that to explain herself to people who didn’t understand her role. She’s worked for this organisation for a few years, and has amazing results getting these teens through their GCSEs.  Someone asked her how she coped with misbehaviour and abuse.  While she downplayed it, she did say it was tiring dealing with these students.  Having done this myself a few years back on a part time basis, I can only imagine how exhausting it would be full time.  So I asked if her organisation looked after its staff. 

'Being honest', she said, 'No'. Most teachers only stay one or two academic years.  She is the longest serving member of staff, but the organisation won’t fund her to complete her teaching qualification. So, despite her years of experience in a difficult role, she is trapped.  She can’t leave like others have, because she wouldn’t be able to get a similar position. And can’t afford to self fund to gain her qualification. (Possibly because she’s not on a great salary, though she didn’t say this.)

It costs to operate like this

It’s costing the organisation to operate like this.  It would cost them around £2,500 to fund this teacher’s qualification.  One source suggests that it is costing them six to nine months salary to replace an employee. [1]   Another, an ACAS study in 2014, put the cost at £30,000 per person.[2] And that’s without factoring in the loss in productivity because the replacement teachers aren’t as skilled at working with this difficult group of students. Their results aren’t as good as they could be, and the impact on reputation will be costing them too.

When I talk about trust (see next post) the example there is of a manager who ‘doesn’t have my back’.  This person did leave that organisation.  They say people don’t leave the job or the organisation, they leave bad managers.  An article in Inc last year put the figure as high as 75% of people leaving because of bad management and leadership[3]It’s clear that lack of support is one of those factors. If people don’t believe their manager, and by extension their organisation, cares about them, then there is no loyalty.

On the other hand, a small manufacturing company gave one of their employees unlimited time off when his wife became seriously ill.  They even paid him for a significant portion of the time he took.  In return, he’ll have no hesitation in staying late, or more realistically, getting in early (his wife is now in a care home, he visits daily) if his company needs a rush job.  He’s unlikely to look for another job, because he wouldn’t know if a new employer will be so understanding about his commitment to his sick wife.

What really matters?

Kevin Murray, who commissioned a YouGov poll, found that the single most important cluster of attributes in getting good results were understanding and caring, which he broke down into these components

  • Makes me feel I contribute
  • Shows how work affects others
  • Gives good feedback
  • Cares about me

About the Author Lindsay Milner

Lindsay is the owner of Silvern Training. Before that she had a very varied working life, doing everything from admin, volunteering, sales, teaching, training, fundraising, management and chairing a board of charity trustees. Now wants to change the world of work by improving workplace cultures so that people can look forward to Monday mornings. Also likes to support individuals to speak up, be better listeners and to take action.

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What happens when there is no trust? - Silvern Training says 10th October 2018

[…] What are you doing to support your team? – Silvern Training on What happens when there is no trust? […]

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